Modern Homes are Burning Eight Times Faster

First responders report that fires recently are burning hotter and faster, likely due to the increase in synthetic furniture and home decor.

Synthetic furniture and decor have been popular because they are cheaper than natural ones. However, most synthetics are made of petroleum (like gasoline), which could result in your house going up in flames in minutes. When synthetics burn, the chemicals released can replace oxygen in the body within two to three minutes of exposure, choking out anyone nearby.

An experiment tested the burn time of two rooms, one furnished with synthetic furniture and the other with natural materials, and demonstrated the difference between synthetic and natural materials.

The room with synthetic furnishings was full of flames and smoke within minutes. Flashover, or floor-to-ceiling flames, occurred as quickly as three minutes and forty seconds. On the other hand, the room with natural furnishings took almost half an hour before flashover. The company that conducted the experiment concluded that modern home fires burn eight times faster.

As a result, firefighters are under more pressure and in more danger than ever before, not only from the greater intensity of the flames but also from the chemicals released when synthetics are burned. In fact, cancer has recently overtaken heart disease as the leading cause of death of firefighters. The exposure to these chemicals affects not only firefighters but homeowners and others in the building when the synthetics are burned.

Some tips to protect your home and the people inside it in case of a fire include:

  • Avoid open concept homes and close doors when possible. In the case of a fire, a closed door between you and the fire can keep temperatures down and provide more than double the oxygen to breathe compared to if the door was open.
  • Make sure your fire protection systems are up-to-date and fully functional. For inspections, maintenance and repairs of your fire protection systems, contact CJ Suppression at (951) 735-5560 for a free quote.
  • Create an escape plan for your home and ensure that all members of your family are well-versed in what to do in the case of an emergency.

Keep Your Home Safe from Winter Fires | Corona, CA

During these chilly winter months outside, we do our best to keep ourselves nice and warm inside. This entails a lot of ways to warm our homes. The problem is, there can be cause for alarm if you do not take the proper precautions in order to keep your and your family fire safe. The following is a list of ways you can protect your home and your loved ones while you stay toasty warm this winter.

  • Have your furnace checked. It’s worth the money to hire a professional to inspect and service your furnace once a year.
  • Have your chimneys and vents checked. If you light fires frequently, you need a chimney sweep service once a year.
  • Test smoke alarms and make sure batteries are fresh.
  • Cover the fireplace with a screen. Tempered glass or a metal screen helps protect sparks from leaving the fireplace.
  • Beware of lit candles. Light candles only when you’re around to watch them and blow them out when you’re ready to leave the room.
  • Beware of space heaters. Don’t put space heaters near curtains, tablecloths or other fluttering fabrics. Buy space heaters with automatic shut-offs before they reach dangerous temperatures.
  • Know how to put out kitchen fires quickly. Keep salt and lids for pans handy to smother a flame.
  • Practice an escape route. Learn how to drop and roll if their clothes were ever to catch on fire.
  • Store a fire extinguisher under the kitchen sink, and in the hall closet near bedrooms.
  • Make sure all household members should know 911.

For more information about winter fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at

Accepting patients from Chino, Ontario, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Fontana and all surrounding areas.

Your Business Needs Fire Sprinklers | Corona, CA

fire sprinklersAccording to the National Fire Protection Association, or NFPA, residential fire sprinkler systems increase the resident’s survival expectancy during an accidental fire by as much as 80%. Such an increase in life expectancy should also be expected in commercial buildings. The reason why fire sprinkler systems are so effective in saving lives is that they’re the fastest to respond and control a fire at its exact point of origin.

While it is easy to raise the point on how fire extinguishers are enough, one has to remember that in fires, it’s not the heat nor flames that are the most dangerous. Rather, the aspect that poses the most hazard to one’s health are the toxic fumes and smoke produced by a fire. And, given how smoke can easily spread and impede your vision, it’s already hard enough to walk around your house, let alone find a fire extinguisher to try and fight the fire back.

It’s also important to remember that sudden fires can easily spread out to uncontrollable levels in just a few seconds. However, with fire sprinklers, that few seconds could extend to as much as 10 minutes, which is more than enough time for people to evacuate the vicinity and for the firefighters to arrive. The NFPA also has no record so far of a fire killing more than two people in both a commercial or residential building where the fire sprinkler system was properly installed and working properly.

The added cost may seem intimidating, but fire sprinkler systems will usually be able to pay for itself in as little as 7 years, which isn’t that long in business years.

For more information about commercial fire sprinklers, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at

Accepting patients from Chino, Ontario, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Fontana and all surrounding areas.

In-Home Sprinkler Systems: What You Need to Know | Corona, CA

Conducting regular maintenance and inspections for residential sprinklers are always a good idea, especially if you have a family you need to protect. Besides, they’re not even that difficult to do and you can easily do it yourself. Here are a few tips to protecting your property:

Make visual checks on all your shutoff valves. The first step is to make a visual check on all the water shutoff valves to see if they’re all open and if the storage tank is full.

Conduct flow tests periodically. Flow tests are also a definite must and should be conducted every few months. Having a system with a clearly-labeled flow-test valve that sprinkles to the outside can help tremendously in this regard. To test, simply open the valve slowly and let the water run its course for more than a minute.

Check the sprinkler components. Make sure that the sprinkler heads and cover plates are not painted over as this will cause problems with their operation.

Use visual signs. Majority of hazards resulting from sprinklers often result from locking the sprinkler valves in the closed position by mistake. Placing signs near the sprinkler components can help remind you and anyone in your house or building what the correct positions are.

Secure the control valves. If your valves are connected to your fire alarm system, you can supervise them electronically. You can also try putting up LO/TO signs to prevent unauthorized closures.

If you have doubts about whether you’ve checked it properly or not, check with your local fire marshal regarding laws regarding sprinklers your area and how to know if a sprinkler inspector is licensed and legitimate.

For more information about in-home fire sprinklers, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at

Accepting patients from Chino, Ontario, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Fontana and all surrounding areas.

Foam: Not Just for Your Coffee Anymore | Corona, CA

As we begin the new year, we tend to think of different ways to improve upon ourselves. Sometimes it isn’t just our health that should be considered. If you are looking to keep you and yours safe and healthy this year, think about the way you can protect yourselves against any home accidents, especially fire prevention. While there may be lots of ways you can be prepared for a fire, one way to keep yourselves safe is a foam fire suppression system.

So, what is foam suppression? Engineered and manufactured, foam fire suppression systems ensure a rapid, thorough and economical response to fires and spills. A light, voluminous foam blanket produced by our high-expansion foam systems can quickly obtain great heights, reaching elevated flammable materials. This foam blanket efficiently transports small amounts of water to the fire, encapsulating the flammable vapors, causing suppression and extinguishment.

Customized to application specifications, engineered systems include: bladder tanks and pump-type balanced-pressure proportioning systems, in-line balanced-pressure proportioning systems, high-expansion foam systems, large dry chemical systems and skids, twin-agent systems and skids, foam trailers, large dry chemical and twin-agent trailers, monitor trailers, aqueous film-forming foam (AFFF) pump systems, water-powered AFFF pump skids, foam/water monitors, nozzles, eductors, ratio-flow controllers, foam makers and chambers, specialized proportioning storage and monitor trailers.

Useful for various purposes, high-expansion foam systems provide protection for the following applications: aircraft hangars, basements, cable tunnels, flammable packaging areas, flammable liquid drum storage areas, hazardous waste facilities, LNG tank farms and loading facilities, mines, roll-paper warehouses, shipboard engine rooms, bilges, and holds, storage buildings, warehouses, and fire breaks.


Do I Need an Energy Storage System? | Corona, CA

Oftentimes, fire suppression systems are determined by federal, state, or local codes – laws which dictate certain suppression requirements, depending on the type of materials and nature of the environment. Technology is changing rapidly, though, and one area where technology is ahead of standards is in the energy storage space. Residential and commercial battery units often contain powerful batteries that can pose a fire risk, but can be addressed with a custom-designed suppression system.

Fire safety standards exist for small scale lithium ion batteries (those in phones and laptops), but fires in these components are very rare – many are designed to fail in safe ways, resulting in fire rates of approximately one in every 10 million devices. Larger battery systems, such as Tesla’s Powerwall home battery, are much newer so fewer standards regulating both their manufacturing and operational suppression systems exist. While Tesla is known to test these units internally in order to understand their behavior in case of fire, many fire departments have little experience with these units, and no standards exist for suppression requirements in residential spaces.

Buyers considering such devices – either in residential or commercial spaces – may consider contacting a suppression firm for expert consultation. In spaces with other installed suppression systems, the suppression system designer should consider whether or not the type of suppression is appropriate for the chemical battery – in some cases, a wet suppression system may be less ideal than a dry system. Owners in residential spaces, or spaces without installed suppression systems, can consult a suppression profession to determine if suppression systems are recommended.

For more information about energy storage systems, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at

Accepting patients from Chino, Ontario, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Fontana and all surrounding areas.

Calming Winds: The Thomas Fire Update | Corona, CA

By Melissa Etehad and Ben Poston / Contact Reporter

December 17, 2017 10:35PM  Reporting from Montecito, CA

Firefighters took advantage of light winds in Santa Barbara County late Sunday, mounting an aggressive attack directly on the massive Thomas fire’s western face a day after powerful gusts pushed flames toward homes along the coast.

Crews were in place to protect homes should a wind shift send the wildfire toward neighborhoods overnight, but authorities said that’s unlikely.

“The fire’s burning in open country right now, which is away from homes, which is exactly where we want it,” said Capt. Rick Crawford, a Cal Fire spokesman. Even so, he said, “We’ll always be in the ‘ready, set, go’ mode.”

Just a day earlier, stronger-than-expected winds kicked up and triggered an epic battle to save homes along the coast. Two homes in the Montecito hills were destroyed and about a dozen structures damaged during Saturday’s flare up.

But firefighters were able to protect about a 1,000 structures because of advanced preparations, officials said. Evacuations were also lifted for the Carpinteria area.

As of Sunday evening, the third-largest wildfire in modern California history was at 270,000 acres and 45% contained, officials said.

Fueled by Santa Ana winds, with gusts topping 70 mph early Sunday in some valley and mountain areas, the blaze burned a massive swath from Santa Barbara to Ventura. By late Sunday, winds had dropped down to 3 to 5 mph, with gusts of about 10 mph, Crawford said.

“We’re in pretty good shape for the time being,” he said.

The fury of monster fire leaves residents no choice but to flee

In Ventura County, firefighters concentrated their forces in the hills above Fillmore where the wildfire stayed within containment lines. Their efforts were hampered during the day by dry conditions combined with low humidity and winds of about 35 mph.

Red flag conditions were forecast in the mountains and valleys of Los Angeles County through Sunday evening as well as parts of Ventura, Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino counties.

Winds are expected to stay calm Monday and Tuesday at 10 to 20 mph, which will “look tranquil” compared with the weekend gusts, said Kathy Hoxsie, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard.

Those calmer conditions should allow firefighters to focus on more defensive work such as bulldozing fire lines and dropping fire retardant. The humidity levels should also increase during the early part of the week — another help for fire crews, Hoxsie said.

But it will be a short respite, as strong winds and low humidity are expected to return on Wednesday in Santa Barbara County and Thursday in Ventura County, Hoxsie said.

In advance of the weekend flare-up, firefighters smothered portions of the Santa Barbara County hills with hundreds of thousands of gallons of fire retardant to keep embers from igniting spot fires. Some hillsides were intentionally denuded above Montecito, Summerland and Carpinteria, including in Romero and Toro canyons, to limit the potential damage.

Santa Barbara County Fire Division Chief Martin Johnson told reporters Saturday night that the aggressive prevention measures had paid off. Hundreds of homes were spared.

“Earlier this evening I was asked the question, ‘How many structures did we lose today?’ ” Johnson said. “That’s the wrong question to ask. The question to ask is, how many did we save today?”

As the winds began to die down in Santa Barbara early Sunday, fire officials said they were going to take advantage of the moment and extinguish smoldering hot spots in the Montecito area.

Rusty Smith, 57, said he fled his home on Gibraltar Road about 1 a.m. Sunday. He stayed with a friend nearby and set his alarm clock to wake him every 90 minutes so he could see if the flames had reached his house.

But firefighters managed to save Smith’s house and about two dozen others in the neighborhood.

“I wasn’t worried. You know when things are out of your control,” Smith said Sunday afternoon, as he swept debris from the driveway of his neighbor’s house. “But we know we were fortunate.”

Resident Lucas Merrick returned Sunday around noon to find that his home also had been spared. As helicopters dropped water on smoldering vegetation, Merrick said his hillside property is much more than a home for him and other residents.

“There’s a spiritual element,” he said. “That’s why people decide to live here.”

Not all homes were spared. On Sunday, a multimillion-dollar house on Park Hill Lane in the Montecito hills was still burning. From the outside, the Spanish-style structure appeared intact, but the interior was almost completely gutted.

All that remained was smoldering ash.

Despite the loss or damage of some homes in the Montecito hills, fire officials emphasized that more homes were saved than lost.

“This is the worst fire condition I’ve seen in the last 32 years,” said Capt. Dave Zaniboni, a spokesman for the Santa Barbara County Fire Department. “It could have been a lot worse. We could have easily lost firefighters or had more homes destroyed. It was a great effort by firefighters.”

Orange County Battalion Chief Mike Summers huddled with his team of firefighters gathered in the parking lot of Cold Springs Elementary School to discuss the day’s plans. The fire had reached into the backyards of some homes on Saturday, and officials wanted to make sure that they were no longer threatened.

He said his crews would be patrolling along Coyote Road to clean up any hot spots.

Despite the long hours, Summers said his team was in good spirits and well-rested. He’s been on the fire for about a week and expects to work through Christmas.

“Many of the firefighters have kids and families waiting at home,” he said. “But we are here for the community. Our first priority is the community, and then our second is family waiting back home.”

Humboldt firefighter Jake Illiam, who was among the crews working in Montecito, said he was also missing his family. He said his daughter will turn 1 this week.

“Today was her birthday party,” he said.

Fire officials said that 8,300 fire personnel have been mobilized to fight the Thomas fire — the largest mobilization of fire crews to fight any wildfire in California history. Firefighting costs so far stand at $110 million.

By Saturday afternoon, Santa Barbara County appeared to be in recovery mode as evacuation orders were lifted for areas around Carpinteria.

For more information about wildfire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at

Accepting patients from Chino, Ontario, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Fontana and all surrounding areas.

CJ Suppression: For all Your Fire Suppression Needs | Corona, CA

fire extinguisher trainingHere at CJ Suppression, we offer a multitude of fire protection services that fit all your fire needs. We are dedicated to supplying top notch service and providing our customers with quality end results. How can we help you with fire safety? Here’s a list of services we provide:

Inspections/certifications. Per the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 25 California Edition codebook, all fire protection systems are required to be inspected and certified. Our trained technicians perform all required inspections.

Title 19 (5-year Inspection). This procedure inspects all components of your fire protection system and is performed every five years.

Backflow. Testing and certification is required annually in most jurisdictions.

Flow tests. The most popular reasons for hydrant flow testing is for system inspection/certification or water flow requirements being obtained for system hydraulic calculation design.

Kitchen hoods. We perform installation, inspection, testing, certification and cleaning of kitchen hoods per NFPA codes requirements.

Maintenance. Maintaining of all fire protection systems is key to ensure proper operation during a fire event. We can provide a structured maintenance program with automatic scheduling within our in-house database, so you don’t have to worry about scheduled maintenance or surprise fire department inspections.

Repairs. We provide repair service of any type of fire protection system from underground fire line to overhead wet, dry or special hazard systems.

24-hr emergency service. Our on-call staff can facilitate support for any type of emergency around the clock.

Employee training. We provide education and training sessions of all types of fire protection systems to employees and or management.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at

Accepting patients from Chino, Ontario, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Fontana and all surrounding areas.

Ways to Protect Your Home During Your Holiday Feasts | Corona, CA

A fire broke out Thanksgiving Eve in a New Hampshire home. A resident of the home came home to find the couch on fire. The fire was just about out thanks to the home’s fire sprinklers. Firefighter made sure the fire was out and removed the smoldering couch. An investigation discovered a lamp inside the home caused the fire. The lamp fell onto the couch when no one was home and the heat from the lamp started the fire. If not for the fire sprinklers, the home could have been consumed by flames.

This was a random occurrence that took place because no one was around to watch it happen. But there are quite a few instances that could cause a fire during Thanksgiving. We have deep-fried turkeys cooking on the porch, we have tons of delicious foods in the oven and on the stovetop. Every year deep-fryer fires are responsible for five deaths, 60 injuries, the destruction of 900 homes, and more than $15-million in property damage, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

Which state has the most accidents? For the last seven years, Texas has led the country in most grease- and cooking-related insurance claims on Thanksgiving Day, with 38 according to insurance company State Farm.  Illinois follows, with 27 reports and Pennsylvania and Ohio are tied for third with 23.  New York ranked fourth, with 22 claims and South Carolina and Georgia claimed fifth with 16 claims each.

Thanksgiving is a holiday for family, friends and food. Make sure you protect yourself and stay safe.


Why You Should Invest in Fire Extinguishers | Corona, CA

As a landlord, it can be tough to control what happens on your property. However, in order for you to prevent the worst-case scenarios from occurring, you must issue a set of ground rules and guidelines for your renters to follow regarding fire prevention:

Learn you fire codes. Pay attention to your local fire codes in order to ensure that you’re legally protected. If you’re unsure if your property doesn’t meet standards, have a fire inspector come check everything out.

Install smoke detectors. It’s very important that you check that the fire detector work before any renters move in, and replace them once renters move out.

Install fire sprinklers. Commercial fire sprinklers respond very quickly and release up to 24 gallons of water per minute, and are one of the best fire protection services that you can invest in.

One fire extinguisher per apartment. If you do own an apartment complex, you should place at least one fire extinguisher in each apartment.

Apply a strict no smoking rule. One of the main causes of home fires is from smoking indoors. By implementing a strict no-smoking ruled both inside and outside of your property you can prevent a fire from occurring.

Make the rules known. Draw up a contract of regulations that your renter need to abide by. You may even want to include this in the lease, or at least have the renters acknowledge the regulations by signing the documents.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at

Accepting patients from Chino, Ontario, Redlands, Moreno Valley, Upland, Rancho Cucamonga, Rialto, Fontana and all surrounding areas.