Category Archives: Fire Extinguisher Training

Products to Extinguish a Fire | Corona, CA

We all want to be prepared for any type of fire emergency. And fires can be extinguished in a few ways. Sure, we automatically go to reach for the fire extinguishers but, they have specific uses. So, before you pick up a fire extinguisher, here is a quick rundown of each and what type of fire they are suited for:

Water extinguishers. If cost-effectiveness is your goal, the water extinguisher is the best bet. These are best at extinguishing Class A fires made from solid material, like wood or paper and have a variety of sprays to choose from. Look for a red label.

Foam extinguishers. Foam extinguishers can be used on Class A and B, or fires made with liquids like gasoline or oils. The foam seals the fire basically suffocating the vapors and snuffing out the fire. These have a cream label.

Powder extinguishers. Next in line is the powder extinguishers, ideal for Class A, B and C fires, or fires involving gasses. Because it uses powder to put out these fires, it isn’t ideal for inside use because it causes a loss of visibility and breathing issues when activated. A blue label identifies these.

Carbon dioxide extinguishers. If you have a place with a lot of electrical equipment, a CO2 extinguisher is a must-have item. Because they don’t leave a residue, they are also suitable for Class B fires as well. Look for a black label.

Wet chemical extinguishers. Kitchen fires are what is considered to be a Class F fire and a wet chemical extinguisher is ideal for these, as well as Class A and B, because the soap-like solution is fast-acting. They have a yellow label. Another option for a kitchen fire is a fire blanket.

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Thousands of SCE Customers Without Power as Strong Winds Batter SoCal | Corona, CA

LOS ANGELES (KABC) — Tens of thousands of Southern California Edison customers were without power Wednesday as strong winds posed the risk of downing power lines that could spark wildfires.

SCE imposed public safety power shutoffs, in which electricity is turned off for customers in wind-prone areas. As of early Wednesday afternoon, over 26,800 SCE customers had their power shut off, while another 36,000 customers were under consideration for shutoffs.

Meanwhile, firefighters battling blazes across the Southland appeared to have gained the upper hand while contending with the strong winds following a day of ferocious Santa Anas that battered mountain and valley areas. Fire crews were working to contain a 43-acre brush fire on the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians reservation near Mecca. The non-injury blaze, which was 50% contained as of Wednesday morning, was reported about 4:40 a.m. Tuesday in the area of Pierce Street and Avenue 73 amid a red flag warning due to high winds and low humidity.

Riverside County Fire Department spokeswoman April Newman said 18 firefighters remained on scene with the goal of fully containing the blaze by the end of the day.

A few fires broke out Tuesday, including one in the Santa Clarita area that blackened 167 acres and a wind-driven brush fire near the westbound 10 Freeway in the San Dimas area that burned about 40 acres. Firefighters appeared to have the upper hand on both blazes Wednesday.

A red flag warning for extreme fire danger expired Tuesday night, but elevated to brief critical fire conditions were still possible Wednesday due to continued strong and gusty offshore winds, according to the National Weather Service.

A wind advisory was in effect until 6 p.m. Wednesday for most of Los Angeles County, and a high wind warning was in effect until 6 p.m. for Orange County coastal areas, and until 10 p.m. for inland Orange County. North to northeast winds of 25 to 40 mph were expected in the San Clarita Valley, with gusts up to 55 mph. Gusts were expected to reach 55 mph in the San Fernando Valley, 50 mph in metro Los Angeles, and 60 mph in the mountains. The winds should become weaker by nightfall, with those number dropping by 15 to 20 mph, the NWS said. On Tuesday, the NWS recorded gusts topping 86 mph in some mountain areas, including Warm Springs and the Magic Mountain Truck Trail in northern Los Angeles County. Other parts of the Santa Clarita Valley were hit with gusts topping 40 and 50 mph, as were select areas of the San Fernando Valley. Winds were also recorded near 50 mph in the Antelope Valley.

The Los Angeles County and city fire departments were prepared up for the wind event, pre-deploying resources in critically endangered areas prior to Tuesday. The Los Angeles Fire Department stationed three task forces in the valleys, while the county fire department ordered “additional staffing and pre-deployment of resources throughout the county.”

Red flag parking restrictions took effect Los Angeles at 8 a.m. The restrictions, which bar residents from parking on streets in high fire hazard zones to ensure fire crews can access hard-to-reach areas, were scheduled to be lifted at 8 a.m. Wednesday. Pasadena imposed similar restrictions at noon, continuing through at least 7 a.m. Wednesday.

Kevin McGowan, director of the county’s Office of Emergency Management, urged residents to be prepared for dangerous conditions.

“Our emergency response officials are world-class and will stand ready to defend lives and property,” he said. “But we need collaboration from all residents who live in L.A. County to stay safe as a region. We must all do our part by staying informed and being ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice, especially if you live in canyon, mountain or foothill communities.”

He urged residents to have an evacuation plan in place and be prepared by taking steps such as parking vehicles facing the street and on driveways — not in garages that may not be accessible if electric garage-door openers become inoperable in an outage.

City News Service contributed to this report.

Time to Gobble Some Deep-Fried Turkey | Corona, CA

Here we are – just a week before Thanksgiving, the one day a year that is nothing but the three Fs: family, food and football. And while this year may seem a bit different than the year’s previous, a giant feast is generally in the cards. And while fire safety is necessary always, there is a variation of a turkey dinner that is a bit more dangerous than others – the deep-fried turkey.

It may sound completely delicious, but it has become one of the more dangerous ways to tan the star of your dinner. In fact, The National Fire Prevention Association has advised against using them altogether. But for the daredevils out there willing to take a chance, here are some things to keep in mind:

  • Keep fryers a safe distance away from trees and structures.
  • Make sure the turkey is thawed and dry before cooking.
  • Never operate a fryer outdoors in the rain or snow.
  • Place the fryer on a level surface.
  • Leave 2 feet between the tank and the burner when using a propane-powered fryer.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to avoid overfilling.
  • Choose a smaller turkey for frying – 8 to 10 pounds is best.
  • Never leave fryers unattended.
  • Purchase a fryer with temperature controls and watch the oil temperature carefully. Smoking oil can catch fire.
  • Turn off the burner before lowering the turkey, then reignite.
  • Wear goggles to shield your eyes and oven mitts to protect your hands and arms.
  • Skip the stuffing when frying turkey and avoid water-based marinades.
  • Keep children and pets away from the fryer at all times.
  • Opt for an oil-less fryer. This uses infrared heat, rather than oil, to cook the turkey.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas

Halloween Safety Tips | Corona, CA

As we carve our jack o’ lanterns and decorate for the spookiest of holidays we have, it is important to remember that roughly 800 home fires are sparked each year. And 1/3 of those fires were sparked by candles. Rather than using a candle, why not use a battery-powered candle or a glow stick. Not only will that lessen the chance of starting an accidental fire, but it will also add a spooky glow safely. Here are some other fire safety tips to consider when celebrating with your little ghouls and goblins:

Costumes. When choosing a costume, it is wise to stay away from ones that have things that hang or drag behind you. These are easy to catch on fire without you knowing as they are away from the body. If a mask is worn, make sure the eye holes are large enough to see your surroundings.

Decorations. Because this is an autumn season, straw and dried leaves are used a lot to decorate. These are all highly flammable items, so make sure to keep them away from any flames or heat sources you may be using. Also, keep fire escapes free from your scary décor.

General safety. As always, it is important to make sure that all of your fire alarms are in working order. We are getting into the colder months, so heaters are coming out and fireplaces are being lit. Have a fire escape route readily available. Make sure everyone in your family know how to stop, drop and roll. Knowledge is key when faced with a fire, so practicing what to do during a fire will only prepare your family to escape from a house fire in the safest way.                                                                    

For more information about seasonal safety tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

TLC for Fire Extinguishers | Corona, CA

fire extinguisher service

Fires can happen at a moment’s notice, and without any warning. Because of this, it is important to have some type of fire protection at all times, whether it be your home or business. One of these fire safety options is the traditional fire extinguisher. It’s a very important tool to have to fight fires, however, if it’s not kept in good working condition, it will most likely be useless when you need it most. Yes, even fire extinguishers need some regular maintenance in order to do their job. To ensure that your fire extinguisher works in the event of a fire, you should follow these guidelines:

  • Make sure that your fire extinguisher is readily available.
  • Be sure that the fire extinguisher is set up properly so it’s easy to handle.
  • Check that your fire extinguisher is adequately charged at all times. Frequently check the pressure dial to see if it needs to be charged.
  • Make sure that the pull pin is properly secured in the handle and held in place by the tamper seal.
  • Inspect the extinguisher for any cracks, dents, or rust on its shaft which may hinder its performance.
  • Ensure that there are visible, legible operating instructions on the fire extinguisher in case of an emergency.
  • Be certain that no modifications have been made to your fire extinguisher that may affect its performance.

If you fail to maintain your fire extinguisher, the resulting consequences can range from property damage to loss of life. In order to avoid problems when you desperately need your fire extinguisher, set a monthly maintenance reminder.

For more information about fire extinguisher maintenance, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

11 Firefighters Hurt in Downtown L.A. Explosion that Caused Fires at Several Buildings | Corona, CA

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By LIAM DILLONBEN WELSHMAY 16, 20207:02 PM UPDATED MAY 16, 2020 | 10:22 PM

An explosion in downtown Los Angeles on Saturday caused a large fire that left 11 firefighters injured, authorities said.

Firefighters first received a call about 6:30 p.m. about a structure fire in the 300 block of Boyd Street south of Little Tokyo, said Erik Scott, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Fire Department.

While firefighters were inside attempting to find the source of the blaze, there was “a significant explosion, very high, very wide, rumbling the entire area,” Scott said. The explosion was so powerful that it blackened a fire engine parked across the street and melted the helmets of some firefighters, he said.

Eleven firefighters were receiving treatment for burn injuries, Scott said. All were taken to County-USC Medical Center. At a news conference at the hospital late Saturday night, Mayor Eric Garcetti said three of the firefighters sustained critical but not life-threating injuries. All were expected to survive.

“We’ve been saying for the last two months even more than usual how much we appreciate our medical personnel and first responders,” Garcetti said. “Tonight I’m doubly and deeply grateful for the both of them.”

Scott said more than 240 firefighters had responded to the blaze before it was extinguished shortly after 8 p.m. An initial investigation of the scene identified the business as Smoke Tokes, a warehouse distributor with supplies for butane hash oil, he said. The cause of the fire has not been determined.

“It’s very tough to see our brothers and sisters go through something like this,” Scott said.

He described how several firefighters were inside the building and on the roof fighting the initial blaze when the explosion occurred, causing a tremendous roar that arriving personnel described as sounding like “a freight train or a jet engine.”

A massive ball of flame erupted out of the building, Scott said. Firefighters ran “straight through that ball of flame to get to safety across the street,” he said.

Major fire in Little Tokyo/downtown Los Angeles at San Pedro and Third. Dangerously close to Skid Row residents, senior and low income housing. Major smoke screen, ash is raining for blocks.

Jeralyn Cleveland was celebrating a family birthday party on the roof of the 13-story apartment building she manages three blocks away when she saw the explosion.

“Everyone in my building thought there was a bomb that went off,” said Cleveland, 37. “It was like a mushroom.”

Cleveland said there are small fires all the time in the neighborhood, which borders skid row, but she had never seen anything like this before.

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Refinery Fire in Metro Los Angeles Controlled by Firefighters | Corona, CA

CARSON, Calif. (AP) – Firefighters have controlled a fire at a large refinery in metro Los Angeles.

Massive flames could be seen burning from the Marathon Petroleum Corporation located 13 miles south of downtown Los Angeles. (Source: KABC/CNN)

The fire erupted late Tuesday at the Marathon Petroleum refinery in the city of Carson.

Firefighters were still pouring water onto part of the refinery early Wednesday, but large flames from the fire had disappeared. No injuries were reported. No harmful products were found in the air near the facility.

An explosion preceded the fire in a cooling tower, according to the Los Angeles County Fire Department. The department said the fire sparked about 10:50 p.m. Crews confined the fire and shut off the fuel supply around 1 a.m. Wednesday, according to a tweet from the fire department. Authorities could not immediately say what sparked the fire.

Marathon is the largest refinery on the West Coast and the company’s website says the refinery has a crude oil capacity of 363,000 barrels daily.

Copyright 2020 Associated Press. All rights reserved. Gray Media Group, Inc., contributed to this report.

For more information about our services, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Family Puts out Christmas Fire After Kid Sets Lawn Ablaze with Magnifying Glass | Corona, CA

Dec. 30, 2019, 8:52 PM PST / Source: TODAY

By Samantha Kubota

Almost every family that celebrates Christmas has a ridiculous story of how someone got into some shenanigans at some point — but it seems likely that only one Texas family can say that this December they accidentally set their lawn ablaze with a magnifying glass.

Nissa-Lynn Parson was not surprised when her 12-year-old Cayden asked for the magnifying glass for Christmas. She explained he loves reading and science, so she assumed that was why he wanted it. “It’s like a basketball player asking for basketball shoes,” she added.

The family donned their matching pajamas and opened presents on the big day. After the exchange, the kids went outside to try to burn a few holes into newspapers with Cayden’s gift. “We were watching it and everything,” Parson explained. “I was happy they were outside playing together! They weren’t playing video games and wanted to go outside.”

Her 15-year-old was holding a paper that caught fire and the wind blew it out of his hands, Parson said, and into the lawn.

“The kids ran inside and said ‘Mom, dad, we got a little bit of the grass on fire!’” she said. They rushed outside and within seconds, the whole lawn was ablaze.

“We’re all in Christmas pajamas, someone had a bucket of water, my husband turned the sprinklers on,” she said. “We got it contained and it wasn’t a problem.”

The family fire brigade was able to extinguish the blaze without calling the fire department. “It could’ve been a lot worse,” Parson said. “We were very blessed and thankful it wasn’t worse.” The fire even took out a small part of their neighbor’s lawn, but Parson said they took it well. “They were totally understanding and they kind of laughed because they also have kids,” she said.

She believes part of the reason her Facebook post went viral was because so many people can identify with it. “I think that’s one of the reasons this story took off, because so many people related,” she said. “(We’re lucky) it just turned out to be a Christmas memory and not a tragedy.”

Samantha Kubota is a digital journalist and editor for TODAY.com.

For more information about our services, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Stay Safe this Holiday Season | Corona, CA

The holiday season is the time of year for family, friends and lots of fantastic festivities. We take a lot of pride in our homes and spend lots of time decorating them to the nines, but we also need to take some time to keep your home and everyone safe and sound. Accidents happen, but they can be prevented by keeping a few tips in mind as we prepare our homes for the celebrations:

Prepare for the worst. First thing’s first – make sure all of your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are tested and running properly. It is also important that everyone in your home knows the fire escape plan, just in case something happens, and you need to exit quickly.

Pamper your pine. An average of 230 home fires that start with Christmas trees each year. If you have a live tree in your home, make sure you get a fresh one and water them daily so that it doesn’t dry out before the holidays are over. If it’s artificial, make sure there is a fire-resistant label.

Check your cords. When it comes to holiday décor, make sure to check all light strands and decorations for any frays or cord damage that may have happened over the year. Never connect more than three at a time and avoid overloading the outlets. Make sure to turn off any sort of holiday lighting before you leave the house or fall asleep.

Stay warm. As you plug in your heaters and spark your fireplaces, ensure that anything that can catch fire is at least three feet away. If you are lighting candles, snuff them out before you leave the room or head off to bed.

For more information about our services, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

We’re Here to Help at CJ Suppression | Corona, CA

fire extinguisher service

Fire safety is important for both you and everything you’re responsible for. We are a one-stop shop for all of these needs because we are dedicated to supplying top notch service with quality end results:

Inspections/certifications. Our trained technicians perform all required inspections and testing to ensure your fire protection system is fully operational.

Title 19 (5-year inspection). This procedure inspects all components of your fire protection system and is performed every five years.

Annual. This procedure inspects the required components of your fire protection system on a yearly basis.

Quarterly. This procedure inspects the required components of your fire protection system every 3 months.

Fire pumps. Fire pump inspections are typically performed annually and more frequent depending on the authority having jurisdiction or insurance carrier.

Backflow. Testing and certification are required annually in most jurisdictions.

Flow tests. Hydrant flow testing are needed for system inspection/certification and water flow requirements for system hydraulic calculation design.

Kitchen hoods. We perform installation, inspection, testing, certification and cleaning of kitchen hoods per NFPA codes requirements.

Maintenance. We can provide a structured maintenance program with automatic scheduling within our in-house database.

Repairs. We provide repair service of any type of fire protection system from underground fire line to overhead wet, dry or special hazard systems.

24-hr emergency service. Our on-call staff can facilitate support for any type of emergency around the clock.

Employee training. We provide education and training sessions of all types of fire protection systems to employees and or management.

Fire extinguisher service. We specialize in service and sales of all fire extinguishers.

Fire extinguisher training. Our onsite training for any size company to ensure proper protocol in case of a fire event.

For more information about our services, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.