Category Archives: Fire Suppression Systems

Keeping Your Cords Sorted | Corona, CA

Do you have more electric appliances than you have sockets? Are you solving this issue by overloading your extension cords? With the holidays coming up, it is time to trim the tree and deck the halls but keeping your loved ones safe is a top priority. Here are some tips to keep in mind as you celebrate the holidays the most festive ways possible:

  • When buying cords, look for those tested and approved.
  • Don’t overload extension cords with too many appliances – check the maximum capacity guidelines.
  • Plug major appliances directly into a wall outlet.
  • Fully insert all plugs into the outlet.
  • Unplug cords when you’re not using them.
  • Don’t use extension cords as permanent wiring.
  • Avoid running cords through water or snow to avoid the high risk of electric shock.
  • Don’t run cords through ceilings, walls, doorways, or under carpets.
  • Keep cords out of the way to prevent tripping.
  • If you use too many extension cords, consider installing more outlets.
  • Avoid chaining multiple extension cords.
  • Never use indoor extension cords outdoors. Only use the cords marked for outdoor use.
  • If a cord heats up or is damaged in any way, discard it.
  • Always use cords with polarized and/or three-prong plugs or force a fit.
  • When using cord-bundling devices, such as spiral wire wrap, avoid cramming cords together to prevent damaging the cord’s insulation.
  • Never use staples or nails to attach cords to a surface to avoid damaging the insulation.

It is important that you design a fire escape plan in case any accidental fires arise. Having smoke detectors and fire extinguishers will also be beneficial. Having these simple things in place will not only prevent property damage but will also keep you calm if there ever was an emergency.

For more information about extension cord safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Autumn Fire Safety Tips for Your Home | Corona, CA

As the summer days dwindle away and the cooler nights start to make their way into our lives, it is a time that we prepare ourselves, and our homes, for the colder months that lie ahead. We are switching off the air conditioner in exchange for a heater or fireplace if we aren’t properly prepared, it can lead to trouble down the road. So, for you and your family to be well-prepared for the upcoming weather, here are a few tips to keep in mind during these chillier months:

Smoke detectors/alarms. Being in a wildfire zone is a tough place to be during these later months, so it is imperative that our home stays on alert. Test your smoke detectors and alarms to make sure they are in working order.

Heating devices. As we get chillier, we make our homes warmer. Give your HVAC a quick inspection and change any filters necessary, leave at least three feet around your space heaters, clean your chimney and make sure to have a screen around your fireplace to ensure ultimate safety.

Garden maintenance. Now that we’ve considered the inside of your home, let’s take a look at how to protect yourself from the outside. Rain gutters and roofs should be kept free of autumn’s gorgeous falling leaves because they are dry and can easily catch fire. In fact, your entire yard should be maintained in order to keep the drier debris away from your home.

Fire escape routes. This may seem like a given, but many homes do not have a fire escape plan. Making sure that your family knows what to do in fire will be key to not only their safety but to prevent panic from happening. Knowledge is key to calmness in chaos.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

How Can I Extinguish this Fire? | Corona, CA

During the summer, we are all more apt to plan our activities outside in the gorgeous warm weather. And many of these activities are going to include fire. BBQs, campfires and fireworks displays are some of the key factors to a fantastic summer.

But there is another side to this summertime fun – fire safety. Because while fire is a key component to our summers, it is important to be safe with said fire. After all, wildfires are becoming a main character here in on the west coast. So, it is important for everyone to be safe and put out the fires before you leave or go to bed for the night. Here are the ways a fire can be extinguished to keep your summer fun safe.

Cooling. It is a good idea to have a bucket of water handy for extinguishing a small fire, like a BBQ or a campfire. Because the water is a coolant, it instantly kills the heat and prevents from spreading. Before you head to bed for the night, be sure to put out the fire so no accidents happen while you sleep.

Smothering. Another alternative to killing a fire is to smother it. When you smother a fire, you basically block out any oxygen from reaching it. And just like us, a fire needs oxygen to breathe.

Starving. Starving a fire is more to do with preventative measures than extinguishing a summer fire. These firebreaks will cause fires to stop in its tracks as there is nowhere else to go.

Interrupting. When you have a chemical fire, water isn’t going to work. In fact, it will make it worse. Using a fire extinguisher will help by suffocating the chemical chain reaction.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

What to Know About the Dixie Fire | Corona, CA

Tuesday: Although it rained on Monday, fire season is well underway. And the state’s biggest blaze is burning near areas scarred from the Camp Fire.

By Jill Cowan | July 27, 2021

Good morning.

There may have been rare July showers in parts of California on Monday. But make no mistake: The drought is still a threat. And fire season is underway.

The Dixie Fire, California’s largest wildfire this year, continued to burn through thousands of acres of rough terrain, prompting evacuation orders and threatening communities in a region scarred by the memory of the 2018 Camp Fire, the deadliest in the state’s history.

More than 5,400 firefighters were battling the Dixie Fire, which merged over the weekend with another nearby blaze, the Fly Fire, and had burned through about 200,000 acres, according to Cal Fire, the state’s fire agency.

That’s an area a little larger than New York City, and about half of the acreage burned by the Bootleg Fire in southern Oregon, the nation’s largest this year. But the Bootleg Fire is burning in a more remote area; 300 people live within five miles of that blaze, according to The New York Times’s wildfire tracker, compared with 4,900 within five miles of the Dixie Fire.

The Dixie Fire started more than a week ago, just a couple of miles from the spot where the Camp Fire ignited, said Rick Carhart, a spokesman for Cal Fire in Butte County. That fire killed more than 80 people and all but leveled the remote town of Paradise.

“There really is so much — there’s no other word for it — PTSD,” Mr. Carhart said. “There’s so much anxiety.”

A stream of firefighting helicopters taking off from a nearby airport in recent days has flown over Magalia, a community that was also devastated by the Camp Fire. Residents there are out of the path of this year’s flames, Mr. Carhart said — but are still afraid.

“They see a helicopter with a bucket attached,” he said. “And it’s, ‘Oh my God, here we go again.’”

The two blazes also bear another chilling similarity: Pacific Gas & Electric, the state’s largest utility, said last week that blown fuses on one of its utility poles may have sparked the Dixie Fire. PG&E pleaded guilty last year to 84 counts of involuntary manslaughter for its role in starting the Camp Fire.

Mr. Carhart said that crews have been making progress in controlling the Dixie Fire, and the weather has been more cooperative in recent days than fire officials had predicted. Nevertheless, the size and timing of the blaze — which he said is already the 15th-largest in California’s recorded history — point to a future in which fires won’t be limited to a single season.

“One of the most concerning things about it is how early in the year it is,” Mr. Carhart.

Last year’s record-breaking wildfire season, during which millions of acres burned across California and the West, actually had a below-average start, he said, until widespread lightning strikes ignited tinder-dry vegetation in many remote areas.

Right now, Mr. Carhart said, the thousands of firefighters who are cutting fire lines, dousing hot spots or doing any of the other time-consuming, physically demanding work required of them, are looking at months before there’s likely to be rain, which heralds an end to the most intense fire activity.

In the past, he said, he might have expected a blaze like the Dixie Fire sometime in September — not July.

“We’re all kind of learning that fire season isn’t a three-month or six-month thing anymore,” he said.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Wildfire Season Is Here: Hardening Your House | Corona, CA

With the warmer days, comes the danger of wildfires here in California. It’s a bittersweet kind of season – fantastic for summer fun in the sun, but always a looming stress about the wildfires that ravage our homes every year. Because your home is susceptible to flyaway embers from fires close by, here are a few ways you can prepare your home, in case wildfire strikes:

Roof. The most vulnerable part of your home, roofs with wood or shingle roofs are at high risk of being destroyed during a wildfire. Use materials such as composition, metal, clay or tile. Block any spaces between roof decking and clear rain gutters to prevent embers from catching and remove accumulated vegetative debris from the roof.

Windows. Install dual-paned windows with one pane of tempered glass to reduce the chance of breakage in a fire and install screens in all usable windows to increase ember resistance and decrease radiant heat exposure.

Walls. Wood products, such as boards, panels or shingles, are flammable and not good choices for fire-prone areas. Instead, use stucco, fiber cement wall siding, fire retardant, treated wood, or other approved materials.

Chimney. Cover your chimney and stovepipe outlets with a non-flammable screen. When not in use, close the fireplace flue.

Garage. Have a fire extinguisher and tools such as a shovel, rake, bucket, and hose available for fire emergencies. Also, install weather stripping to prevent flying embers from blowing in.

Fences. Best practice is to separate your fence from your house or upgrade the last 5-feet of the fence to a noncombustible material to reduce the chance of the fence from bringing fire to your home.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

‘It’s like having gasoline out there’: Grim fire season starts much drier in U.S. West than record-shattering 2020 | Corona, CA

by: Associated Press, Steve Kuzj, Lauren Lyster Posted: May 24, 2021 / 01:14 PM PDT / Updated: May 25, 2021 / 03:49 PM PDT

As bad as last year’s record-shattering fire season was, the western U.S. starts this year’s in even worse shape.

The soil in the West is record dry for this time of year. In much of the region, plants that fuel fires are also the driest scientists have seen. The vegetation is primed to ignite, especially in the Southwest where dead juniper trees are full of flammable needles.

“It’s like having gasoline out there,” said Brian Steinhardt, forest fire zone manager for Prescott and Coconino national forests in Arizona.

A climate change-fueled megadrought of more than 20 years is making conditions that lead to fire even more dangerous, scientists said. Rainfall in the Rockies and farther west was the second lowest on record in April, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

“It means that the dice are loaded toward a lot of forest fire this year,” said Park Williams, a UCLA climate and fire scientist, who calculated that soil in the western half of the nation is the driest it has been since 1895. “This summer we’re going into fire season with drier fuels than we were at this time last year.”

In addition, the western drought is deepening week by week.

In late March, less than one-third of California was suffering extreme or exceptional drought. Now more than 73% is, according to the National Drought Monitor, which is based on precipitation, temperature, soil moisture and streamflow measurements. A year ago, heading into the record-smashing 2020 fire year when more than 4% of California burned, just 3% of the state was in extreme or exceptional drought.

But the outlook is worse elsewhere.

“I think the Southwest is really primed for a bad fire season,” University of Utah fire scientist Phil Dennison said. That’s because last year’s normal monsoon season, which brings much of the year’s rainfall, never showed up.

A year ago, none of Arizona, Nevada and Utah was in extreme or exceptional drought, but now more than 90% of Utah, 86% of Arizona and 75% of Nevada is in those highest drought categories, according to the drought monitor. New Mexico jumped from 4% extreme or exceptional drought a year ago to more than 77% now.

UCLA meteorologist Daniel Swain, who also works for the National Center for Atmospheric Research and The Nature Conservancy, said key factors going into fire season are soil and plant wetness.

“So is soil moisture very low? Is vegetation extremely dry? Absolutely, yes. Unequivocally, yes. Pretty much everywhere in California and the Southwest,” Swain said. “So that box is checked big time in a way that is going to massively increase the potential background flammability … given a spark, given extreme weather conditions.”

This doesn’t necessarily ensure the 2021 fire season will be worse than 2020. Last year more than 15,800 square miles of the United States burned, an area about the size of Maryland and Delaware combined. Several scientists said last year’s fires were stoked not just by hot, dry conditions, but by unusual situations that made a bad year horrific:

Two intense heat waves — one that nearly set a record for hottest temperature on Earth in Death Valley — set the stage, and a freak California lightning barrage provided lots of spark.

The lightning outbreak was the type that has happened only a few times in history and is unlikely to occur two years in a row, Swain said.

“Maybe it won’t be the hottest summer,” he said, adding. “I’m really grasping at straws here. All we have going for us is dumb luck.”

When the scientists see extremely dry or dying trees, they get even more worried.

In Arizona, junipers are succumbing to the 20-year drought and its two-year intensification, said Joel McMillin, a forest health zone leader for the U.S. Forest Service there. Officials haven’t done a precise count but anecdotally the die-off is 5% to 30% with some patches up to 60%.

Until the dead needles drop to the ground, which takes a year or so, the fire hazard increases, fire manager Steinhardt said. “So you have something that’s highly flammable and it’s … 20-, 30-, 40-foot tall and every single one of those needles on there now becomes an ember that can be launched.”

“This is probably one of the driest and potentially most challenging situations I’ve been in,” said the veteran of 32 fire seasons.

In California, normally drought-tolerant blue oaks are dying around the San Francisco Bay Area, said Scott Stephens, a fire science professor at the University of California, Berkeley. “They don’t have access to water. Soil moisture is so low. When you start to see blue oak dying, that gets your attention.”

Human-caused climate change and decades of fire suppression that increases fuel loads are aggravating fire conditions across the West, scientists said.

Global warming has contributed to the megadrought and is making plants more prone to burning.

Normally a good part of the sun’s energy removes water from plants and soil, but when they are already dry, that energy instead makes the air hotter, which creates a feedback loop, Swain said.

And drier conditions lead to beetle infestations that further weaken and kill trees, said University of Utah’s Dennison.

For decades, U.S. firefighting agencies have tried to put out fires as quickly as possible, and that’s usually worked, UCLA’s Williams said. But the practice resulted in the buildup of dense trees, brush and other potential fire fuels.

“Fire is escaping our control increasingly frequently,” he said. “And some of the reason for that might be because of increasing density of fuels. But we also see that these fires are escaping our control during record-breaking heat waves — and it’s the warmest, driest years when we have the hardest time controlling fires.”

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Safety Tips for Your Home | Corona, CA

Accidental fires

During the pandemic, we were forced to figure out things to keep us occupied at home. Some of us learned to bake bread, others learned to eat bread – lots of it. Regardless of how we spent our time indoors, it is important that we keep ourselves safe and sound from fire. After all, accidents happen all the time – we should be aware of anything that can lead to one. Here are a few tips to keep in mind:

  • When cooking, keep your eye on everything on the stove and make sure to turn off the oven after you’re done.
  • Clean out your laundry lint traps. Believe it or not, the lint can catch on fire.
  • Make sure you’ve stored any toilet paper surplus away from any heat source, like a furnace or clothes dryer.
  • Candles are a great way to soothe a soul, just make sure to buy flameless ones to prevent accidents.
  • During your family time, why not discuss a fire escape plan? Everyone’s input will not only ensure that everyone is aware of what to do but will create a special bonding because you are looking after each other.

Summertime is a great time to get outside and enjoy the sun. And now that we are slowly able to hang out with friends and family again, BBQs are wonderful ways to celebrate. If you’re sparking the grill, make sure to keep it at least three feet from the house. Any random sparks could possibly ruin your fun. Being prepared for any accidents is a great way to not only protect your property and loved ones, but also allows you to relax and enjoy yourself.

For more information about fire safety tips for your home, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Evacuation Orders Lifted After Fire Near Castaic and Valencia Burns 650 Acres | Corona, CA

By ABC7.com staff / Thursday, April 29, 2021 8:37AM

CASTAIC, Calif. (KABC) — A fire in the Castaic and Valencia area quickly spread to at least 650 acres, triggering mandatory evacuation orders and road closures in the area. By around 10 p.m. the evacuation orders were being lifted as firefighters reported stopping the forward progress of the blaze and reaching at least 25% containment.

Earlier in the day, evacuations were ordered for residents north and west of West Hills Drive, north of Iron Village Drive, north and west of Tesoro Del Valle and north of Copper Hill Drive due to the North Fire, the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station announced.

A voluntary evacuation order had been in place for the area of Rye Canyon Loop.

Road closures were in place for West Hills Drive from Iron Village Drive to the northern Copper Hill Drive entrance in Valencia.

The fire was first reported around 2 p.m. east of the 5 Freeway and northeast of the Wayside Canyon area in Castaic. It was named the North Fire. It later spread to the Valencia/Santa Clarita area.

The blaze was initially described as about 1 acre burning uphill in light to medium fuels. The flames initially were burning near a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department facility that stores live weapons and ammunition. Firefighters were at that time advised to hold back for their own safety.

Within minutes the fire was estimated at 4-10 acres and then spread to 30 acres. By 4 p.m. it was estimated to have spread to 90 acres and then grew to at least 650 acres by 8 p.m.

Fixed wing aircraft, air tankers and helicopters were being used to battle the flames, along with ground crews.

The elevated fire weather danger remains in effect for L.A. and Ventura counties through Saturday amid warm temperatures, dry conditions and periods of gusty winds.

“It’s kind of scary. It’s not uncommon living here in Santa Clarita,” said resident Rob Tapert. “Every other year, it seems like I’m doing this, but goes with the territory living so close to the so-called national forest over there.”

No injuries were reported.

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Is Your Home Equipped with a Fire Extinguisher? | Corona, CA

Does your home have a working fire extinguisher? Many will answer yes. But do you know if it is in working order? Chances are, you haven’t even thought about that fire extinguisher since you purchased it. Don’t worry – you aren’t alone. Unfortunately, home fires aren’t at the top of our minds on a day-to-day basis. When it comes down to it, the only time you’d probably think of a fire extinguisher is when you need them in an actual fire emergency, but these life saving devices could very well end up saving your life once you get to know just how important they are.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, back in 2019, the United States fire departments responded to as many as 1,291,500 fires. While fire extinguishers certainly couldn’t have prevented all those disasters, their presence could’ve at least minimized the damages.

Fact is, it’s not hard to think of the possibility that portable fire extinguishers have been used a lot more times to prevent fires from spreading than what’s commonly known. At home, having fire extinguishers can certainly help a lot, but they’re not the only additional measure that you can take.

Working smoke detectors and a good home fire evacuation plan should both be implemented in your home if they aren’t already. Having fire sprinklers installed all throughout the vicinity can also help contain and even kill the fire. However, unlike fire extinguishers, fire sprinklers turn on automatically once the fire reaches certain levels, which, if when it cannot eliminate the fire, the fire sprinkler can buy you enough time to evacuate or get the extinguisher.

Be safe by staying prepared and keeping a functioning fire extinguisher inside your home at all times.

For more information about fire extinguishers, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Landlord Problems: Fire Protection for Your Tenants | Corona, CA

When deciding to be a manager of a residential property, it is important that you keep up health and safety standards in order to keep your property safe for your tenants. One of these areas would be fire safety. Because there are loads of circumstances that can happen, extra precautions need to be taken in order to ensure the property will be safe from any and all dangers. Not only for you and your investment, but for your employees and tenants. And one of the biggest, and most devastating, dangers you may face is fire, not only affecting your business, but those neighbors around you. To ensure you have taken all proper precautions to ensure the safety of all, you may need to make a few improvements.

Tenant improvement can be a hassle and a potential danger if not done properly. For this reason, CJ Suppression provides installation, relocation, and rework within tenant improvement and remodels. We will thoroughly modify and add to existing to fire sprinkler systems to ensure the safety of your business. Not only will you rest at ease, knowing you’ve taken care of your investment, you can be sure everyone will rest at ease knowing you are looking after their well-being.

The following are different types of fire suppressions systems that we install and services we provide for all your tenant improvement needs:

  • Fire sprinkler systems
  • Dry/chemical systems
  • Preaction sprinkler system (Single/Double Interlocked)
  • ESFR (Early Suppression Fast Response) sprinkler systems
  • Rack storage systems
  • Roof and ground storage tank installations
  • Underground fire lines
  • Special hazard systems
  • Centrifugal and vertical fire pump installations and upgrades

For more information about fire protection options, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.