Category Archives: Fire Updates

Brush Fire in San Bernardino National Forest Stopped at 34 Acres, Temporarily Closes Highway 18 | Corona, CA

By RUBY GONZALES | rugonzales@scng.com and QUINN WILSON | qwilson@scng.com | San Gabriel Valley Tribune PUBLISHED: June 28, 2021 at 1:09 p.m. | UPDATED: June 28, 2021 at 6:54 p.m.

Firefighters on the ground, along with helicopters and planes, battled a brush fire on Monday, June 28, that started when a car crashed near Old Waterman Canyon Road in San Bernardino, temporarily shut down Highway 18 and burned 34 acres.

Update 1: Closure remains in place on SR-18 from 40th to 138 due to #PeakFire. Commuters must use other available routes to get up and down the mountain. It is unknown when closure will lift. #Caltrans8

— Caltrans District 8 (@Caltrans8) June 29, 2021

One firefighter suffered heat injury and was taken to a hospital.

The fire was burning in the forest, said Zach Behrens, a spokesman for the San Bernardino National Forest. There were no evacuations, he added.

The fire’s forward progress was stopped around 1:43 p.m., according to National Forest officials. By around 5:15 p.m., crews had reached 10 percent containment on the blaze.

#PeakFire update: now approximately 24 acres. Highway 18 closure is now in effect from Highway 138 down to 40th street. pic.twitter.com/7YKkN1pgs7

— San Bernardino National Forest (@SanBernardinoNF) June 28, 2021

The fire was reported around 10:50 a.m. off of Old Waterman Canyon Road. It headed west upslope, crossed Highway 18 and moved at a rapid rate, Behrens said.

The fire was determined to be ignited by a single-car crash involving a BMW that quickly spread to the adjacent vegetation, according to Lisa Cox, spokeswoman for the National Forest.

“This is a great opportunity to remind people that parking the side of the road where there’s any vegetation at all is not a good idea,” Cox said. “Of course, accidents happen, but if you ever need to pull over be sure to use one of the paved turnouts along highways like (Highway 18).”

Cox said firefighters responded to the initial call regarding the fire, then learned about the car crash. It was not immediately clear if anyone was injured in the crash or the subsequent car fire.

Authorities closed Highway 18, between 40th Street in San Bernardino and Highway 138 in Crestline. The upbound lanes were expected to be fully reopened at 8 p.m. while downbound will have one lane open through Tuesday morning, June 29, Caltrans said.

UPDATE: Upbound 18 will open fully at 8pm tonight. Downbound 18 will have one lane open at 8 pm tonight until further notice. At least through tomorrow morning. https://t.co/ztEmYA2MzV

— Caltrans District 8 (@Caltrans8) June 29, 2021

Behrens said 150 firefighters responded along with five helicopters and nine fixed-wing aircraft.

For more information about fire safety tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

‘It’s like having gasoline out there’: Grim fire season starts much drier in U.S. West than record-shattering 2020 | Corona, CA

by: Associated Press, Steve Kuzj, Lauren Lyster Posted: May 24, 2021 / 01:14 PM PDT / Updated: May 25, 2021 / 03:49 PM PDT

As bad as last year’s record-shattering fire season was, the western U.S. starts this year’s in even worse shape.

The soil in the West is record dry for this time of year. In much of the region, plants that fuel fires are also the driest scientists have seen. The vegetation is primed to ignite, especially in the Southwest where dead juniper trees are full of flammable needles.

“It’s like having gasoline out there,” said Brian Steinhardt, forest fire zone manager for Prescott and Coconino national forests in Arizona.

A climate change-fueled megadrought of more than 20 years is making conditions that lead to fire even more dangerous, scientists said. Rainfall in the Rockies and farther west was the second lowest on record in April, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

“It means that the dice are loaded toward a lot of forest fire this year,” said Park Williams, a UCLA climate and fire scientist, who calculated that soil in the western half of the nation is the driest it has been since 1895. “This summer we’re going into fire season with drier fuels than we were at this time last year.”

In addition, the western drought is deepening week by week.

In late March, less than one-third of California was suffering extreme or exceptional drought. Now more than 73% is, according to the National Drought Monitor, which is based on precipitation, temperature, soil moisture and streamflow measurements. A year ago, heading into the record-smashing 2020 fire year when more than 4% of California burned, just 3% of the state was in extreme or exceptional drought.

But the outlook is worse elsewhere.

“I think the Southwest is really primed for a bad fire season,” University of Utah fire scientist Phil Dennison said. That’s because last year’s normal monsoon season, which brings much of the year’s rainfall, never showed up.

A year ago, none of Arizona, Nevada and Utah was in extreme or exceptional drought, but now more than 90% of Utah, 86% of Arizona and 75% of Nevada is in those highest drought categories, according to the drought monitor. New Mexico jumped from 4% extreme or exceptional drought a year ago to more than 77% now.

UCLA meteorologist Daniel Swain, who also works for the National Center for Atmospheric Research and The Nature Conservancy, said key factors going into fire season are soil and plant wetness.

“So is soil moisture very low? Is vegetation extremely dry? Absolutely, yes. Unequivocally, yes. Pretty much everywhere in California and the Southwest,” Swain said. “So that box is checked big time in a way that is going to massively increase the potential background flammability … given a spark, given extreme weather conditions.”

This doesn’t necessarily ensure the 2021 fire season will be worse than 2020. Last year more than 15,800 square miles of the United States burned, an area about the size of Maryland and Delaware combined. Several scientists said last year’s fires were stoked not just by hot, dry conditions, but by unusual situations that made a bad year horrific:

Two intense heat waves — one that nearly set a record for hottest temperature on Earth in Death Valley — set the stage, and a freak California lightning barrage provided lots of spark.

The lightning outbreak was the type that has happened only a few times in history and is unlikely to occur two years in a row, Swain said.

“Maybe it won’t be the hottest summer,” he said, adding. “I’m really grasping at straws here. All we have going for us is dumb luck.”

When the scientists see extremely dry or dying trees, they get even more worried.

In Arizona, junipers are succumbing to the 20-year drought and its two-year intensification, said Joel McMillin, a forest health zone leader for the U.S. Forest Service there. Officials haven’t done a precise count but anecdotally the die-off is 5% to 30% with some patches up to 60%.

Until the dead needles drop to the ground, which takes a year or so, the fire hazard increases, fire manager Steinhardt said. “So you have something that’s highly flammable and it’s … 20-, 30-, 40-foot tall and every single one of those needles on there now becomes an ember that can be launched.”

“This is probably one of the driest and potentially most challenging situations I’ve been in,” said the veteran of 32 fire seasons.

In California, normally drought-tolerant blue oaks are dying around the San Francisco Bay Area, said Scott Stephens, a fire science professor at the University of California, Berkeley. “They don’t have access to water. Soil moisture is so low. When you start to see blue oak dying, that gets your attention.”

Human-caused climate change and decades of fire suppression that increases fuel loads are aggravating fire conditions across the West, scientists said.

Global warming has contributed to the megadrought and is making plants more prone to burning.

Normally a good part of the sun’s energy removes water from plants and soil, but when they are already dry, that energy instead makes the air hotter, which creates a feedback loop, Swain said.

And drier conditions lead to beetle infestations that further weaken and kill trees, said University of Utah’s Dennison.

For decades, U.S. firefighting agencies have tried to put out fires as quickly as possible, and that’s usually worked, UCLA’s Williams said. But the practice resulted in the buildup of dense trees, brush and other potential fire fuels.

“Fire is escaping our control increasingly frequently,” he said. “And some of the reason for that might be because of increasing density of fuels. But we also see that these fires are escaping our control during record-breaking heat waves — and it’s the warmest, driest years when we have the hardest time controlling fires.”

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Evacuation Orders Lifted After Fire Near Castaic and Valencia Burns 650 Acres | Corona, CA

By ABC7.com staff / Thursday, April 29, 2021 8:37AM

CASTAIC, Calif. (KABC) — A fire in the Castaic and Valencia area quickly spread to at least 650 acres, triggering mandatory evacuation orders and road closures in the area. By around 10 p.m. the evacuation orders were being lifted as firefighters reported stopping the forward progress of the blaze and reaching at least 25% containment.

Earlier in the day, evacuations were ordered for residents north and west of West Hills Drive, north of Iron Village Drive, north and west of Tesoro Del Valle and north of Copper Hill Drive due to the North Fire, the Santa Clarita Valley Sheriff’s Station announced.

A voluntary evacuation order had been in place for the area of Rye Canyon Loop.

Road closures were in place for West Hills Drive from Iron Village Drive to the northern Copper Hill Drive entrance in Valencia.

The fire was first reported around 2 p.m. east of the 5 Freeway and northeast of the Wayside Canyon area in Castaic. It was named the North Fire. It later spread to the Valencia/Santa Clarita area.

The blaze was initially described as about 1 acre burning uphill in light to medium fuels. The flames initially were burning near a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department facility that stores live weapons and ammunition. Firefighters were at that time advised to hold back for their own safety.

Within minutes the fire was estimated at 4-10 acres and then spread to 30 acres. By 4 p.m. it was estimated to have spread to 90 acres and then grew to at least 650 acres by 8 p.m.

Fixed wing aircraft, air tankers and helicopters were being used to battle the flames, along with ground crews.

The elevated fire weather danger remains in effect for L.A. and Ventura counties through Saturday amid warm temperatures, dry conditions and periods of gusty winds.

“It’s kind of scary. It’s not uncommon living here in Santa Clarita,” said resident Rob Tapert. “Every other year, it seems like I’m doing this, but goes with the territory living so close to the so-called national forest over there.”

No injuries were reported.

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Northridge Apartment Fire Caused by Cooking Oil – 3 Injured | Corona, CA

Accidental fires

A stovetop fire spread quickly throughout a 60,000-square-foot apartment building in Northridge Thursday.

NORTHRIDGE, CA — 95 firefighters took 33 minutes to extinguish a fire that broke out on the third floor of a large Northridge apartment building, according to the Los Angeles Fire Department.

As of 12:17 p.m., LAFD paramedics have evaluated three civilians for unspecified but non-life-threatening injuries, and one person was transported to a nearby hospital. No other injuries or fatalities have been reported.

The fire broke out just before 11:45 p.m. Thursday in a 3rd floor unit of a 60,246 square-foot, three-story, 53-unit apartment building on the 9800 block of North Reseda Boulevard, just across the street from LAFD Station 70, according to the LAFD. Firefighters were able to confine the fire at around 12:15 p.m., and the building remains standing. Most residents quickly self-evacuated, but LAFD crews had to help one person get out of the building, according to LAFD spokesperson Brian Humphrey. Fire sprinklers were not present in the building, but functioning fire alarms allowed most residents to safely escape.

The fire was caused by flames from a stove-top fire, fueled by cooking oil. Although the person cooking tried to stop it with fire extinguishers, the blaze broke windows and allowed strong winds to spread it and send thick smoke through the top of the building, Humphrey told City News Service.

“With the thick smoke challenging the escape of occupants from several of the 52 other apartment units, firefighters swiftly ascended ground and aerial ladders to perform strategic vertical ventilation of the attic with chainsaws, making the top floor exit paths more tenable to escapees, and allowing their colleagues with hose lines to more readily attack the seat of the fire,” Humphrey said.

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Thousands of SCE Customers Without Power as Strong Winds Batter SoCal | Corona, CA

LOS ANGELES (KABC) — Tens of thousands of Southern California Edison customers were without power Wednesday as strong winds posed the risk of downing power lines that could spark wildfires.

SCE imposed public safety power shutoffs, in which electricity is turned off for customers in wind-prone areas. As of early Wednesday afternoon, over 26,800 SCE customers had their power shut off, while another 36,000 customers were under consideration for shutoffs.

Meanwhile, firefighters battling blazes across the Southland appeared to have gained the upper hand while contending with the strong winds following a day of ferocious Santa Anas that battered mountain and valley areas. Fire crews were working to contain a 43-acre brush fire on the Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians reservation near Mecca. The non-injury blaze, which was 50% contained as of Wednesday morning, was reported about 4:40 a.m. Tuesday in the area of Pierce Street and Avenue 73 amid a red flag warning due to high winds and low humidity.

Riverside County Fire Department spokeswoman April Newman said 18 firefighters remained on scene with the goal of fully containing the blaze by the end of the day.

A few fires broke out Tuesday, including one in the Santa Clarita area that blackened 167 acres and a wind-driven brush fire near the westbound 10 Freeway in the San Dimas area that burned about 40 acres. Firefighters appeared to have the upper hand on both blazes Wednesday.

A red flag warning for extreme fire danger expired Tuesday night, but elevated to brief critical fire conditions were still possible Wednesday due to continued strong and gusty offshore winds, according to the National Weather Service.

A wind advisory was in effect until 6 p.m. Wednesday for most of Los Angeles County, and a high wind warning was in effect until 6 p.m. for Orange County coastal areas, and until 10 p.m. for inland Orange County. North to northeast winds of 25 to 40 mph were expected in the San Clarita Valley, with gusts up to 55 mph. Gusts were expected to reach 55 mph in the San Fernando Valley, 50 mph in metro Los Angeles, and 60 mph in the mountains. The winds should become weaker by nightfall, with those number dropping by 15 to 20 mph, the NWS said. On Tuesday, the NWS recorded gusts topping 86 mph in some mountain areas, including Warm Springs and the Magic Mountain Truck Trail in northern Los Angeles County. Other parts of the Santa Clarita Valley were hit with gusts topping 40 and 50 mph, as were select areas of the San Fernando Valley. Winds were also recorded near 50 mph in the Antelope Valley.

The Los Angeles County and city fire departments were prepared up for the wind event, pre-deploying resources in critically endangered areas prior to Tuesday. The Los Angeles Fire Department stationed three task forces in the valleys, while the county fire department ordered “additional staffing and pre-deployment of resources throughout the county.”

Red flag parking restrictions took effect Los Angeles at 8 a.m. The restrictions, which bar residents from parking on streets in high fire hazard zones to ensure fire crews can access hard-to-reach areas, were scheduled to be lifted at 8 a.m. Wednesday. Pasadena imposed similar restrictions at noon, continuing through at least 7 a.m. Wednesday.

Kevin McGowan, director of the county’s Office of Emergency Management, urged residents to be prepared for dangerous conditions.

“Our emergency response officials are world-class and will stand ready to defend lives and property,” he said. “But we need collaboration from all residents who live in L.A. County to stay safe as a region. We must all do our part by staying informed and being ready to evacuate at a moment’s notice, especially if you live in canyon, mountain or foothill communities.”

He urged residents to have an evacuation plan in place and be prepared by taking steps such as parking vehicles facing the street and on driveways — not in garages that may not be accessible if electric garage-door openers become inoperable in an outage.

City News Service contributed to this report.

Brush Fire near Corona Airport Explodes to 750 Acres, Shuts Down Highway 71 in Both Directions | Corona, CA

By Rob McMillan and ABC7.com staff

Friday, December 4, 2020

CORONA, Calif. (KABC) — A fire that erupted near the Corona Municipal Airport has grown to 750 acres, shutting down a main road in the area, authorities said Thursday morning.

The blaze, dubbed the Airport Fire, started Tuesday night and exploded in size by Thursday as strong winds continued to whip across Southern California, leading to other fires across the region. As of 4:40 p.m. Thursday, the fire was 10% contained.

Early Thursday morning, the flames prompted the closure of State Route 71 in both directions between the 91 Freeway and Highway 83, according to CAL FIRE/Riverside County Fire Department. Residents of the Sonora Ranch neighborhood, which is approximately less than two miles away from the blaze, have been keeping a close eye on the flames since it started earlier this week. Some say their concerns grew when the winds kicked up overnight.

“When the winds started kicking up last night and sounded like waves crashing up against the house, that was the concern for us,” said Tahisha Cattouse. “I was still able to sleep but then this morning my husband goes ‘the fire is still here and it jumped the freeway’.”

An evacuation warning had been issued for several streets (Big Springs Court., Rock Ridge Court, Cheyenne Road, Homestead Road, Holster Street and Lone Tree Street). But by 10 p.m. Wednesday the warnings were lifted.

The fire was first reported Tuesday night behind the airport at the Prado Basin at less than five acres. But red flag conditions – Santa Ana winds and low humidity – kept it going and spreading to at least 25 acres by early afternoon Wednesday, then 50 acres later in the day. No damage to structure or injuries have been reported.

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas

Holiday-Proof Your Home from Accidental Fires | Corona, CA

Now that we are officially in the middle of the holiday season, it’s important to keep safety in mind. Between fireplaces and heating systems cozying up your beautifully decorated homes, fires can spark if we aren’t careful. In order to have a safe, happy holiday season for you and yours, follow these fire safety tips:

Make sure all of your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are tested and running properly. It is also important to have an escape plan in place, just in case something happens, and you need to exit quickly. If you have guests or family staying with you, let them know the correct route to take to make sure they escape safely.

If you decide you would like to have a live tree in your home, make sure you get the freshest of trees and water them daily so that it doesn’t dry out before the holidays are over. If you are going with an artificial tree, make sure there is a fire-resistant label.

When it comes to holiday décor, make sure to check all electrical light strands and decorations for any frays or cord damage and never connect more than three at a time to avoid overloading the outlets and stash cords along walls and out of doorways to avoid tripping.

As you plug in your heaters and spark your fireplaces, ensure that anything that can catch fire is at least three feet away. If you are lighting candles, snuff them out before you leave the room or head off to bed.

If you take the proper precautions, you won’t have to worry about anything but the memories you and your family will have for years to come.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas

Thousands in California Face Power Shutoffs During Fire Weather | Corona, CA

Utility Southern California Edison said nearly 50,000 of its customers could go dark as a prevention measure.

Nov. 27, 2020, 4:18 PM PST

By Dennis Romero

Thousands of utility customers in Southern California were warned they could be in the dark Friday because dry, windy fire weather was whipping the region.

Initially 100,000 customers were under consideration for precautionary power cutoffs to prevent sparking fires, but that number was reduced to 47,000 by afternoon, said Taelor Bakewell, a spokeswoman for Southern California Edison.

Still, electricity was cut off to 15,796 customers Friday under the preventative plan, she said.

Customers in Los Angeles, Orange and Riverside counties could still be affected, she said. Another 2,739 customers in San Diego County were warned of possible shutoffs from San Diego Gas & Electric, the utility said.

The city of Los Angeles has its own taxpayer-run utility that doesn’t participate in precautionary outages. The shutoffs have otherwise become customary during dry, windy weather in California.

State fire officials determined that Pacific Gas & Electric transmission lines were the cause of the state’s deadliest blaze, 2018’s Camp Fire, and the utility agreed to billions of dollars of settlements connected to a rash of Northern California fires in 2017.

Even in late November, with overnight temperatures producing freeze warnings in some parts of Southern California, fire weather can erupt. The weekend’s forecast includes dry, offshore winds from the U.S.-Mexico border to Ventura County.

Gusts of up to 65 mph were possible in regional mountains through Saturday afternoon, the National Weather Service said.

“What drives the fire risk is not just temperature,” said Tom Fischer, a weather service meteorologist in Oxnard. “It’s wind, low humidity and fuel moisture.”

The winds could subside by Sunday, he said: “But don’t let your guard down.”

Dennis Romero writes for NBC News and is based in Los Angeles.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas

California Wildfires Still Growing but Some Residents Are Allowed to Return Home | Corona, CA

By Madeline Holcombe and Cheri Mossburg, CNN Updated 6:46 PM ET, Tue October 27, 2020

(CNN)Two out-of-control wildfires in Southern California grew Tuesday, but while officials issued some new evacuation orders, they also told many residents from Irvine they could go home.

The Silverado Fire near Irvine has charred 12,600 acres and is 5% contained. Just north of that, the Blue Ridge Fire near Yorba Linda has ballooned in size, more than doubling its footprint, currently calculated at 15,200 acres. The fire, which is 0% contained, has damaged 10 homes.

More than 80,000 people have been told to stay away from their homes, including some NFL football players for the Los Angeles Chargers. That number is down by about 20,000, as many residents who fled Irvine have been told the area is safe now.

Southern California Edison said a power line may have played a role in igniting the Silverado Fire, according to a report filed with California Public Utilities Commission. The initial safety incident report describes overhead electrical facilities in the area where authorities think the fire started but notes no activity on the circuit.

“…(It) appears that a lashing wire attached to a telecommunications line may have contacted SCE’s power line above it, possibly starting the fire,” SCE spokesman Chris Abel told CNN.

Between the fires roaring in Southern California and dry, windy conditions prompting red flag warnings in Northern California, power companies have enacted Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS). Nearly 130,000 customers in California were without power Tuesday afternoon, according to PowerOutage.US. The bulk of the customers are managed by Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) for Northern California and Southern California Edison.

Fire officials said 1,800 people are battling the two fires, and on Monday two of them were critically injured. The men suffered second- and third-degree burns while battling the Silverado Fire near Irvine, Orange County Fire Authority Chief Brian Fennessy told reporters.

Fennessy said Tuesday they were “fighting for their lives.” “I know them personally. They are strong. Having gotten to know their parents over the past 24 hours, I can see where they got their strength, Fennessy said. “It’s tough to feel this helpless.”

The men, ages 26 and 31, are part of Orange County Fire Authority’s ground crew. Their names haven’t been released. The team uses hand tools to stop wildfire flames from progressing, much like hotshots. Three other firefighters had minor injuries, were treated at the hospital, and released.

As Ed Pascasio fled from the Silverado Fire on Monday afternoon with his wife, niece and sister-in-law, he watched embers flying toward their neighborhood.

“The sky was orange, kind of like doomsday,” he said. “I’ve never seen it change dramatically that fast.”

The cars packed on main roads — filled with fleeing residents — resembled a movie scene, Pascasio said.

“A lot of neighbors were leaving at the same time. Everyone was shocked by the speed of it all,” he said.

This has been a devastating year for fires. At least 8,000 fire incidents reported by Cal Fire have burned a record 4 million acres and claimed the lives of 31 people this year so far. And dry, windy conditions have prompted power shutoffs to prevent more.

CNN’s Sarah Moon, Amir Vera, Joe Sutton, Eric Levenson, Stella Chan and Steve Almasy contributed to this report.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas

El Dorado Fire Burns 18,506 Acres, 63 Percent Contained | Corona, CA

INLAND EMPIRE, CA — Crews brought containment on the massive El Dorado Fire to 63 percent by Wednesday night, but thousands of evacuations were in place with 26,031 structures still threatened, fire officials said.

The “very dynamic” blaze had consumed 18,506 acres and injured 12 people, officials reported. More than 1,300 firefighting personnel are assigned to the blaze that has destroyed four homes and six outbuildings. It has damaged two other homes and six outbuildings, Cal Fire said.

“… great work by firefighting resources assigned to the El Dorado Fire continued today,” officials said Wednesday night. “The fire slowly backed down at low intensity into a retardant line placed along Hwy. 38 in the vicinity of Angelus Oaks. Ground crews were able to directly attack the fire utilizing hose lines to protect the community.”

A high-pressure weather system was in place Wednesday, causing hot and dry conditions, according to Cal Fire.

Evacuation orders remained in effect for: Mountain Home Village, Forest Falls, Angelus Oaks and Seven Oaks. Big Bear residents are not under evacuation but are asked to remain alert and watch updated orders.

Fire officials are asking evacuated residents to remain patient as crews continue to work in their neighborhoods. A Red Cross evacuation center is located at the Redlands East Valley High School, 31000 E. Colton Ave. in Redlands. Highway 38 is closed between Bryant St. to the south and Onyx Summit to the north.

Smoke from the El Dorado, Bobcat and Valley fires is impacting Inland Empire air quality. A Daily Smoke Report issued by the Wildland Fire Air Quality Program is available, and residents can also visit www.airnow.gov for air quality updates in their area. Most of Riverside County is forecast to have unhealthful air quality on Wednesday, officials said.

Cal Fire officials said the brusher was sparked Sept. 5 by a smoke-emitting firework used at a gender-reveal gathering of family members at El Dorado Ranch Park in Yucaipa. Record heat and dry conditions helped the fire quickly spread north to the Yucaipa Ridge, fire officials said.

The Desert Sun reported that the family who planned the small gathering was cooperating with authorities and that no charges have been filed yet.

Fire officials told the publication that the family called 911 after trying to extinguish the blaze themselves. They remained on the scene until firefighters arrived according to the report.Cal Fire Capt. Bennet Milloy said the blaze remains under investigation.

“Those responsible for starting fires due to negligence or illegal activity can be held financially responsible and criminally responsible,” CalFire officials said Sunday.

Milloy said investigators are testing the mechanism used at the family gathering to see if it’s considered a “safe and sane” firework. But he said “safe and sane” pyrotechnic devices are illegal in Yucaipa.

For more information about fire updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.