Category Archives: Residential Suppression

Extinguish Your House Fire with Sprinklers | Corona, CA

The most dangerous thing about fire is not its heat or the flames, but the toxic fumes and smoke that the fire produces. It makes it hard to see and difficult to breathe, while the toxic fumes deliver a knock-out that could literally kill you before the fire has any chance of getting close to you. Given how fire spreads so quickly and how being caught in one already makes for an extremely stressful situation, thinking about killing the fire with a fire extinguisher isn’t exactly easy. Even if you do manage to get to the fire extinguisher, what happens if the flame is already too big, or that the smoke is already too thick for you to see where you’re going? Enter fire sprinklers

When fire sprinklers are installed properly and routinely checked to make sure that they’re working, fire sprinklers can, in worse case scenarios, give you and your family as much as 10 minutes of cool, clean air to safely escape from your home.

With fire sprinkler systems, you have a means of controlling the flame. They may not be able to extinguish large fires, they are often able to contain the fire enough to keep the damage to your home at a minimum while firefighters arrive.

The added cost of having fire sprinklers installed and maintained isn’t exactly cheap but does add value to your home and insurance premiums should be cheaper. But there are also plenty of other advantages that any homeowner can enjoy if they choose to have a residential fire sprinkler system is installed – the fact that you, your family, as well as your investment, is well protected.

For more information about fire sprinklers, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

The ABCs of Household Burn Prevention | Corona, CA

Accidental firesWe are often talking about how to prevent and protect yourself from fires, but there are times when it cannot be prevented, and we become injured. A burn can come in many forms, especially within a household; whether it be from a kitchen accident or just being too hasty taking a bite of that deliciously hot slice of pizza. This is why it is so important to be aware of your surroundings when using even the most modest of hazardous household items. And because February hosts Burn Awareness Week, let’s take a quick look at how you can protect yourself and your family from running into any of these common home-based burn threats:

Keep an eye on appliances such as irons, curling irons or hair dryers that can heat up quickly or stay warm after use. Avoid contact with your skin while in use and unplug these items once finished.

Cleansers, weed killers, and pool chemicals can cause burns because of the strong chemicals used. Keep these locked away/out of reach.

Make a habit of placing matches, gasoline and lighters in a safe place, out of children’s reach. And if you have little ones, avoid novelty lighters or lighters that look like toys.

When making electrical repairs, always turn off circuit breakers beforehand; avoid using electrical appliances while showering or wet; use child safety plugs in all outlets; keep electrical cords out of children’s reach.

When it comes to heating the home, create a safety zone to keep children and pets away from heating devices such as woodstoves, fireplaces, portable heaters, and furnaces.

For more information about burn prevention, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

The Paradise Fire Sets off Alarm Bells for Peninsula and Carmel Valley Residents | Corona, CA

By Pam Marino – Monterey Country Now

Shortly after the massive destruction and death toll of the Camp Fire in Paradise became known to the world in early November, the phones started ringing in Monterey County Supervisor Mary Adams’ office. Nerves were rattled among people living on the Monterey Peninsula and in Carmel Valley, and they wanted to know what was being done to prevent a similar disaster in their neighborhoods.

For some, the 1987 Morse Fire in Pebble Beach – which consumed about 160 acres and 31 structures, doing $18 million in damage – still resonates. An investigation later blamed lots of dry fuel in the forest during a drought year, winds coming off the ocean and from the east and wood-shingled rooftops covered in pine needles.

That day in May 1987, the weather conditions were just right, says Monterey Fire Chief Gaudenz Panholzer. The Peninsula’s fog and mild weather generally help minimize the risk of wildfires as deadly as the Camp Fire or 2017 Tubbs Fire in Santa Rosa, Panholzer adds, “but once in awhile we have dry hot days. Those are the days we all sweat bullets as firefighters.”

Weather is one factor in the spread of wildfires. Another is the accumulation of dry brush, dead wood and nonnative plants, which the area has plenty of, Panholzer says. It’s what has residents worried, as one Carmel resident who lives along Pescadero Canyon told the Carmel City Council in January. With homes lining one side of the forested canyon across from Pebble Beach, he said, “We have the most to lose.”

“We need to manage the forest as a healthy forest,” Panholzer says. That means thinning, and sometimes leaving dead tree trunks behind to foster a healthy ecosystem among birds and bugs. He believes Peninsula cities in wooded areas like Carmel and Pacific Grove – which contract with Monterey FD for fire services – and Monterey are doing a good job of clearing their forested areas.

Carmel is looking at renting goats in the coming year to eat up dry grass and overgrown shrubs, as has been done in Pebble Beach, says City Administrator Chip Rerig. They cost between $1,500 and $2,000 an acre, for a minimum of five acres. Goats can reach steep areas humans can’t, plus they eat poison oak.

Fostering relationships among local emergency agencies has “stepped up,” Panholzer says, including with Cal Fire, Monterey Regional Fire Protection District and others. Representatives from a number of agencies met Jan. 24 to brainstorm evacuation plans. Adams hosts a meeting for the public to ask questions of fire officials from 6-8pm on Jan. 31 at Palo Corona Regional Park.

Ultimately, however, Panholzer says residents who live in wooded areas have to be prepared for the possibility, and have plans in place for evacuating with pets, photos and important documents.

 

Fire Sprinklers in the Home? Find Out Why | Corona, CA

When we think of fire sprinklers, we generally don’t assimilate it with our home. Thought of as something that is designed for businesses and factories, fire sprinklers aren’t a concern for many homeowners. But should they be? Let’s take a look at their advantages – you may reconsider your decision:

Can’t stop the blaze. As smart as smoke alarms are these days, they can’t extinguish fire. Sprinklers do and continue to do so as you and your family run for safety. Also, by stopping the fire as soon as it starts, sprinklers can prevent, or at least reduce, the amount of property damage.

Not activated by smoke. Your fire alarm going off because of burned toast and a snuffed candle certainly can be annoying. With sprinklers, you don’t have to worry about that because they are activated via heat, not smoke.

Instant help. Sprinklers will activate within a minute – a whole lot less time than it takes for your local firefighters to get to your home. Also, sprinklers can help slow down the fire and minimize the damage done until the firefighters arrive to completely douse the fire.

Cost-effective. Firefighters use an average of 2,935 gallons to extinguish your regular residential fire. That’s many times more than the 341 gallons of water used by sprinklers on average.

Insurance-friendly. Your insurance provider may lower your premiums thanks to your sprinkler system. Be sure to contact your home insurance provider to know if this applies to you.

The costs of having sprinklers installed far outweigh the costs of losing a huge part of your house. In some cases, families lose their entire homes because of residential fires. Don’t let that happen to your family by having sprinklers installed.

For more information about fire sprinklers, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Crispy Nights Call for Toasty Fires | Corona, CA

As the autumn months progress and the temperatures are slowly beginning to drop, we all begin to prepare for the chilly weather by warming up our homes. And if you have a fireplace, wood or pellet stove, this means it’s time to prepare your fireplace and chimney to ensure a safe season. Let’s take a look at some of these steps…

First thing’s first, everything needs a good cleaning. If you have a chimney, hire a licensed chimney specialist to not only give a good your chimney a good cleaning, but can also check for any issues that may have come up during the warmer months. Clean your stoves and fireplaces as well and make sure you don’t have any combustible items near a flame.

When you light your fires, make sure the flue is open to vent properly and keep mesh guards to ensure no embers escape. Conversely, if you have glass doors in front of your fireplace, keep those doors open to ensure the fire completes combustion and reduce creosote build-up in your chimney.

Never leave a fire unattended – make sure the fire is completely out before leaving the house or going to bed. After your fire, you will have plenty of ashes. They need to cool, at times it can take up to several days, before disposal. Keep the ashes in a metal can at least 10 feet away from your home.

Autumn is a beautiful time of year, one that is welcomed by toasty fires and hot apple cider. Don’t let accidents ruin this snuggly time.

For more information about fireplace maintenance, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona and all surrounding areas.

Prepare for a Malfunction | Corona, CA

fire sprinklersWe all assume that if we have fire protection, it will work when the time comes to use it. Whether it be something simple like a fire extinguisher or as elaborate as a customized fire suppression system, these tools are things we need to rely on when a fire breaks out. If it doesn’t, the result can be a disaster.

It’s important to note that simply installing a suppression system is only one step in staying safe. Fire suppression systems are often complex pieces of engineering, and they require care, testing, and maintenance in order to remain functional.

The type of system installed, and the nature of the building it is protecting, will determine how often it must be inspected, how often it should be tested, and what type of labor will be required on the system over time. A skilled system designer, such as CJ Suppression, will not only design the system, but can also assist you in establishing and meeting the maintenance and inspection requirements in order to keep your system functioning properly so that if a fire were to occur, lives and property can be saved.

The exact maintenance regime needed depends on the suppression system and use case. The National Fire Prevention Association (NFPA) has guidelines not only for the types of systems that should be used in various settings, but also for the ongoing maintenance of those systems for proper compliance and safety purposes.

To ensure their reliability, fire systems must be inspected, tested and maintained. CJ Suppression Services’ qualified and experienced staff stands ready to provide fire protection service and maintenance that will keep your fire protection systems reliable and code compliant.

For more information about fire suppression maintenance, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona and all surrounding areas.

Dozens of Massachusetts Homes Exploded. A Gas Expert Weighs In. | Corona, CA

by RACHEL GUTMAN

SEP 14, 2018

WCVB / AP

Investigators still don’t know what happened, but there’s one likely explanation.

Late Thursday, dozens of explosions erupted in three towns in northern Massachusetts. As many as 70 fires, explosions, and suspected gas leaks were reported to state police, with at least 39 homes affected in Lawrence, Andover, and North Andover. One person was killed when a chimney collapsed on his car, and at least 25 more people were reportedly treated for injuries.

In a statement, Columbia Gas said a total of 8,600 customers will be without service until safety teams can ensure that their homes and businesses are leak-free.

A widespread series of explosions like the one in Massachusetts is “really rare,” says Robert Jackson, a professor of energy and environmental science at Stanford University. Jackson’s studies focus on the environmental impacts of natural gas, and he has mapped thousands of gas leaks in cities around the country, including Boston. He told me that such an event is “unprecedented in recent years,” since explosions are usually isolated to a single building.

Jackson is not involved in investigating the Massachusetts explosions, but he was able to offer some insight into what could have caused such a strange, dramatic incident. The most likely explanation, he says, is the one most reports have speculated: Pipelines in the towns became suddenly over-pressurized. In the same way that high-voltage power lines traverse hundreds of miles before breaking off into lower-voltage tributaries in neighborhoods, natural-gas delivery systems consist of both long-distance, high-pressure pipelines and local ones that are only nominally pressurized and deliver gas into homes. Neighborhood pipelines are usually designed to withstand two to three times their normal operating pressure, but any increase makes gas more likely to escape.

“I can’t imagine another explanation for this event than a flush of pressurized gas,” Jackson says.

If local lines indeed were suddenly inundated with high-pressure gas, Jackson says, that could result in an explosion in one of two ways. First, the pipes themselves could explode. Second—and more likely, according to Jackson—excess pressure could have caused gas to leak out of pipes and valves and into homes, where it could be ignited by a pilot light and send whole buildings up in flames.

In most cases, according to Jackson, such rapid pressurization would be caused by a failure at a valve that separates high- and low-pressure pipelines. As for what would lead to such a failure, Jackson says, it could be that “somebody made a mistake. To flip the wrong valve, leave a junction open. Human error is the most common source of natural-gas explosions.”

Columbia Gas’s website announced an improvement campaign just a few hours before the explosions began, though no evidence has yet linked the explosions to pipeline updates or botched repairs. (A spokesperson for Columbia Gas did not respond to a request for comment.)

A flush of gas could also occur if older valves leak or break. In 2015, Jackson and his colleagues found that cities like Cincinnati that replaced their aging pipelines had 90 percent fewer gas leaks a mile than older cities like Boston that relied on older, cast-iron pipes. Across the country, Jackson says, many local pipelines are more than a century old—including in Boston, the closest major city his team studied to Thursday’s explosions.

Even though natural-gas leaks are fairly common, serious consequences aren’t. From 1998 to 2017, 15 people a year, on average, died in incidents related to gas distribution in the U.S. “Significant incidents”—those that do things such as cause an injury or death, result in at least $50,000 of damage, or lead to a fire or explosion—happen about 286 times a year.

That might sound like a lot. But then again, the streets of Boston carry an average of four gas leaks a mile.

 

Prepare for Anything: Evacuation Edition | Corona, CA

It seems everywhere we look, there is a wildfire threatening some part of California. Not only is it sweeping through forests and other wildlife, but residential areas are becoming affected, leaving many family’s without shelter due to evacuation. Being prepared for evacuation is not only going to make you feel better but will also help keep your family calm during these stressful times. Here is a checklist of things you should keep in mind during these summer dangers:

Inside the House

  • Shut all windows and doors, leaving them unlocked.
  • Remove flammable window shades, curtains and close metal shutters.
  • Remove lightweight curtains.
  • Move flammable furniture to the center of the room, away from windows and doors.
  • Shut off gas at the meter; turn off pilot lights.
  • Leave your lights on so firefighters can see your house under smoky conditions.
  • Shut off the air conditioning.

Outside

  • Gather up flammable items from the exterior of the house and bring them inside (patio furniture, children’s toys, door mats, trash cans, etc.) or place them in your pool.
  • Turn off propane tanks and move BBQ away from structures.
  • Connect garden hoses to outside water valves or spigots for use by firefighters. Fill water buckets and place them around the house.
  • Leave exterior lights on so your home is visible to firefighters in the smoke or darkness of night.
  • Put your emergency supply kit in your vehicle.
  • Have a ladder available for firefighters to quickly access your roof.
  • Seal attic and ground vents with pre-cut plywood or commercial seals.

Animals

  • Locate your pets and keep them nearby.
  • Prepare farm animals for transport and think about moving them to a safe location early.

For more information about evacuation tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona and all surrounding areas.

Stay Safe this Summer with Fire Prevention | Corona, CA

Contrary to popular belief, we are not at high risk for fires in hotels or other public places. But, in fact, our biggest threats are at home, where we typically feel our safest. And since much of our summertime fun involves BBQs and fun with friends and family, it is important to be ready for any type of fire danger, from accidental fires at home to wildfires that pop up without warning. One way to do this is with fire sprinklers. You may not automatically think about fire sprinklers in our homes, but home fires can cause property damage, or far worse – take the lives of our loved ones.

Nearly, 2,500 people lose their lives each year in home fires in the United States. It can be nerve wracking to think about these statistics, however, this should be a reason to consider installing fire sprinklers in your home.

Because Hollywood makes an exaggerated image of everything, including fires, many people seem to think that when a fire occurs, the entire system goes off & soaks the place down. This is false. When one fire sprinkler is triggered, the rest do not activate. Nearly 85 percent of the time only one fire sprinkler activates during a fire, which as mentioned earlier, results in significantly less property damage when compared to a fire hose. And now that homes are burning more quickly than before due to having larger spaces and lightweight construction materials, having a fire suppression system is extremely important.

Summertime is a fun time for getting outside and enjoying the weather. Make sure you have one less worry by having fire sprinklers installed in your home.

For more information about fire extinguishers, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona and all surrounding areas.

Fire Sprinkler Makes Quick Work of Ridgefield Blaze | Corona, CA

 Accidental fires

By Katie Gillespie, Columbian Education Reporter

Published: May 24, 2018, 9:43 AM

A fire sprinkler saved the day for a Ridgefield family whose stove caught fire Thursday morning, said Tim Dawdy, Clark County Fire & Rescue spokesman. About 8 a.m., Clark County Fire & Rescue responded to a kitchen fire at 184 N. 43rd Place in Ridgefield. Someone was cooking fries in oil when the stove caught fire and burned the kitchen cabinets, he said.

But the home, a condo in a new development in the north Clark County city, had fire sprinklers, which quickly extinguished the blaze before it spread. By the time firefighters arrived, the only thing left to do was mop up the water.

“These simple, inexpensive fire sprinklers really do their job,” Dawdy said. Neither condo on either side of the home was damaged.

Three adults live at the condo, Dawdy said. No one was injured. There were no children or pets in the home.

A fire is a scary thing, especially contained inside a large complex like a condominium complex. Don’t risk the lives of others and your property, install fire sprinklers in your housing or business complex. Fire sprinklers buy you time to get people out of the building and help to suppress the fire keeping it contained to one location.

For more information about fire sprinklers, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

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