Category Archives: Residential Suppression

Smoke from Western Fires Fuels Dangerous Air Quality | Corona, CA

Over 90 large fires across seven states are triggering alerts over poor air

By Zach Rosenthal | September 13, 2022 at 1:56 p.m. EDT

Dangerous blazes continue to spread across the West, with 93 large fires burning in seven states.

As smoke plumes rise into the skies, alerts for hazardous air quality are in effect in parts of Oregon, Washington state, Idaho, Wyoming and Montana. A special weather statement about hazardous air quality was also issued in east-central California and western Nevada. The smoke is most dense and toxic near its source but has also expanded in lesser amounts all the way to the East Coast.

Idaho — where the Moose Fire, the nation’s second largest, is burning — leads the pack in terms of large fires, according to the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC).

Firefighters are battling 34 large fires in the state, followed by 23 in Montana, 13 in Washington, 12 in California and nine in Oregon. Utah and Wyoming each report one large fire.

In Oregon, eyes are on the Cedar Creek Fire, which has grown to more than 86,000 acres after being sparked by lightning Aug. 1. After days of extreme fire growth, the fire remains uncontained. The rapidly spreading blaze has forced nearly 1,500 evacuations, while blanketing nearby cities such as Bend in dangerously high levels of smoke. Smoke from the fire has prompted alerts in south-central Oregon.

Firefighters are also battling the massive Double Creek Fire in Oregon, which has burned more than 155,000 acres and is currently the nation’s largest blaze. That inferno has prompted the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality to issue an air quality advisory for the northeastern parts of the state.

Fire and heavy smoke conditions in the West are unlikely to abate anytime soon, as hot and dry conditions have left forests ripe for fire growth. Red-flag warnings have been hoisted for much of eastern Wyoming because of hot, dry conditions conducive to fires.

Hazardous air quality conditions — air quality index (AQI) levels of 301-plus — have been observed in at least five states, including California, where the Mosquito Fire continues to burn between Sacramento and Reno, Nev., in the Sierra Nevada.

The Mosquito Fire has forced officials to evacuate more than 11,000 people. At least 25 homes have already been destroyed by the blaze, which has torched more than 48,700 acres and is just 16 percent contained.

Other active and dangerous fires in California include the Fairview Fire, which still burns close to the town of Hemet, though it is now 56 percent contained. Downpours from the remnants of Tropical Storm Kay have assisted crews in containing that blaze. That fire has burned more than 28,000 acres and killed two people who were trying to flee the blaze.

As more fires in the West are ignited and active fires expand, the smoke can travel as far as the East Coast and in the past has even blown into continental Europe. Wildfire smoke has been found to be surprisingly harmful to people even far from the source. A study published in 2021 found that three-quarters of smoke-related cases of asthma visits to emergency departments and deaths occurred east of the Rocky Mountains.

“Smoke is not just a Western problem,” said Katelyn O’Dell, lead author of the study and postdoctoral research scientist at George Washington University.

O’Dell suggested there may be a “lack of awareness” in the East about the effects of smoke, “because you’re not in proximity to these large wildfires, and they don’t really impact your day-to-day.”

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration described an “expansive area of light smoke” covering most of the Lower 48 state, except for the far southeast and far southwest on Monday. However, computer simulations indicate much of the smoke in the eastern United States is at relatively high altitudes, meaning it shouldn’t substantially compromise air quality near the ground. But NOAA reported some “moderate to thick smoke” had already reached as far east as Colorado, the Dakotas, Minnesota and Iowa.

AirNow.gov, which monitors pollution across the country, showed air quality had worsened to “moderate” in portions of Colorado, including Denver, as well as northern Minnesota and western Iowa on Tuesday.

A total of 49,820 wildfires in the United States have burned 6,726,028 acres this year; both of these numbers are ahead of the 10-year average through Sept. 13.

Research has shown that human-caused climate change has contributed to an increase in the frequency of large fires and the size of the area burned by Western wildfires, as fire seasons become longer and more dangerous.

Jason Samenow contributed to this report.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Cooking Safety Tips for Older Adults | Corona, CA

Accidental fires

We all want to feel safe in our own homes. It’s a sanctuary away from all of the outside world’s madness. We kick off our shoes, fix ourselves a nice hot meal and curl up on the couch with our favorite relaxing pastime. We keep a first aid kit handy, lock our doors, we keep our phone charged and close by – all of these little habits keep us prepared for anything.

One of the leading causes of home injuries and deaths in the home is related to cooking. And those of us that are 65+ are at an even higher risk. Unfortunately, we all need to eat. And while all these tips work for everyone, let’s also protect those of us on the latter side of life with these simple cooking tips for fire safety:

Don’t forget. There are times when we get sidetracked – it’s natural. So, if you need to step away from the kitchen for even a small amount of time, turn off the oven/stove.

Keep it clean. Grease fires can start unexpectedly. To lessen the chance of these happening, keep the range clean from grease or other debris that can accidentally catch from a stray flame.

Tighten things up. The last thing we think about when we are in the kitchen is what we are wearing. When cooking, keep your sleeves rolled up to prevent accidentally catching on an open flame.

Test the alarms. It’s important to test smoke detectors on a monthly basis and change out batteries once a year. Keeping these alarms in abundance throughout the house will give ample time to get to safety.

For more information about cooking fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

California’s Oak Fire destroys at least 42 structures as it burns more than 18,000 acres near Yosemite National Park | Corona, CA

By Elizabeth Wolfe and Steve Almasy, CNN | Updated 8:29 PM ET, Wed July 27, 2022

(CNN)California’s Oak Fire has burned through more than 18,000 acres and destroyed more than 40 structures since it ignited near Yosemite National Park Friday, as fire crews in the air battle visibility issues and personnel on the groundwork steep terrain.

The fire grew only slightly Tuesday — to 18,532 acres and containment remained at 26%, according to an update from state fire management agency Cal Fire.

“Although good progress continues on the fire, there is much work to be done,” the update said. Officials said several evacuation orders had been changed to fire advisements.

Some areas are not accessible to bulldozers so crews on foot cut in a fire line, and smoke from the fire hampered the response from the 24 helicopter units involved.

One firefighter stood Wednesday morning by a spot where they had been able to stop the flames from advancing.

“For the past two days what we’ve been doing is coming back with hoes and … hand tools. We dig out all the smokes and hot spots to make sure that nothing ends up on … the green side (where vegetation wasn’t burned),” firefighter Travis Gooch told CNN’s Adrienne Broaddus. “It’s kind of a relief that everything is kind of looking like it’s holding up the way it’s supposed to.”

Gooch, who is from Manteca, said he and his team work overnight and slept for about an hour on their firetrucks.

“The first night we were here, no one slept,” he said. “So, last night to get to sleep for an hour. It was nice. Everyone is looking forward to going back to camp and getting to sleep for today.”

There have been no firefighter injuries reported since the blaze began, the cause of which is under investigation.

A total of 42 single residence structures and 19 outbuildings have been destroyed in the fire, the update said. More than 1,100 structures remain threatened.

On Tuesday morning, Cal Fire officials said in the overnight incident report: “Fire crews continue providing structure defense, extinguishing hot spots, and building and improving direct lines. Persistent drought, critically dry fuels, and tree mortality continue to contribute to the fire’s spread.”

More than 3,000 personnel are tackling the fire, deploying air and land efforts including two dozen helicopters, 286 fire engines, 68 water tenders and 94 bulldozers, according to Cal Fire.

The challenging terrain and abundant dry vegetation fueling the fire has complicated efforts to tamp down its growth, Cal Fire spokesperson Cpt. Keith Wade told CNN Monday.

“The footprint out here, the acreage of available fuels to burn when the fire gets going, along with the available topography — the canyons, the drainages — the wind that flows through these areas, can make the fire behavior erratic and it can explode … the ferociousness of that fire at times can be intense,” Wade said.

The Oak Fire is the largest of California’s fire season so far, Cal Fire data shows. But it remains relatively small compared to other California wildfires in recent years: It’s dwarfed, for example, by blazes like last year’s Dixie Fire, which consumed more than 960,000 acres, or the August Complex Fire the year prior that scorched more than a million acres — the state’s largest ever.

There have been 23 wildfires in California so far this month, according to Cal Fire, but only three have exceeded 500 acres. None have come close to the mass destruction of the Oak Fire, due in part to the exceedingly dry conditions in the area, Wade said.

“I think the real difference that firefighters are experiencing on this one is how dry everything is, it’s definitely been (drier) as the years have been going on,” he said. “We’ve noticed that there seems to be less precipitation, less moisture and the available fuel load is definitely out there.”

The fire’s rapid growth has also made evacuation efforts more difficult, Cal Fire Battalion Chief Jon Heggie told CNN on Monday, noting officials and law enforcement are doing their best to notify residents when they need to leave.

“The reality is, it’s moving so quickly, it’s not giving people a lot of time and they are sometimes just going to have to evacuate with the shirts on their back,” Heggie said.

The incremental progress made by fire crews has allowed officials to reduce evacuation orders in some areas to fire advisements, Cal Fire said.

An evacuation shelter has been set up at Mariposa Elementary School for displaced residents.

Mariposa County has been under a state of emergency since Saturday, when Gov. Gavin Newsom announced the proclamation.

Southern California fire officials have been expecting this summer to bring an especially challenging fire season due to the increased frequency of wildfires and the dry, hot conditions in much of the state.

Heggie attributed the Oak Fire’s “velocity and intensity” to the state’s prolonged drought and human-caused climate change.

“What I can tell you is this is a direct result of what is climate change,” he said. “You can’t have a 10-year drought in California and expect things to be the same. And we are now paying the price for that 10-year drought and that climate change.”

California is among the western states that have been suffering under a prolonged megadrought that has been heavily exacerbated by the climate crisis.

“That dead fuel that’s a result from that climate change and that drought is what’s driving these, what we are now calling, ‘mega fires,'” Heggie said.

It’s not just the Western US dealing with extreme fire conditions. Wildfires around the globe have intensified and become more commonplace, according to a report from the UN Environment Programme. The report’s analysis found the number of extreme wildfire events will increase by 30% by 2050.

The report suggested it’s time we “learn to live with fire,” urging authorities and policymakers to cooperate with local communities to use Indigenous knowledge and invest in planning and prevention efforts.

CNN’s Poppy Harlow, Taylor Romine, Stella Chan, Sara Smart and Rachel Ramirez contributed to this report.

For more information about the Oak fire, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

It’s Grilling Time. Do It Safely. | Corona, CA

The sun is blazing. You invite over a few of your closest, crack open some brews and spark up the grill. It’s the perfect time of year for charred meat – not charred guests. To ensure a good time will be had by all, it’s important to know a few grilling tips. Because 9000 fires, on average, involve grilling. So, let’s take a look at a few ways your grill may become something more dangerous:

Clean your grill. What is better than a greasy burger? When you use a gas grill, it is important that you make sure to clean your grill on a regular basis. Not only do those delicious juices drip down your chin, but they also drip down into the grease trap, creating a secondary fuel source. In addition, there are insects and spiders love to make grills their homes. If not cleaned, it is possible to create a grease fire or a flashback fire from the webs and insect nests.

Clear the area. For some, having flammable things nearby can accidentally get ignited by wild embers from the grill. In order to limit these accidents, make sure shrubs, awnings and other property that can become damaged from an accidental BBQ fire. Well-ventilated areas are ideal for a successful event.

Pay attention. This may be a no-brainer but keeping an eye on your grill at all times will not only turn your grilling into a delicious meal, but there are lots of factors that can cause an accident to occur. Tiny humans, furry friends and even an unruly guest can cause some issues to transpire. Make sure someone has eyes on the grill until it is no longer needed.

For more information about the Sheep fire, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

The Almost 900-acre Sheep Fire Is 85% Contained, Evacuations Lifted | Corona, CA

BY HAYLEY SMITH, GRACE TOOHEY | PUBLISHED JUNE 14, 2022 UPDATED JUNE 15, 2022 10:47 PM PT

Crews seem to have turned a corner on the almost 900-acre wildfire burning near Wrightwood in the Angeles National Forest, with the blaze 85% contained Wednesday night.

The Sheep fire, which ignited Saturday, exploded in size through Tuesday, engulfing 865 acres and prompting evacuation orders and warnings for residents in the area.

All evacuation measures, which had been in place since Sunday for communities in and around Wrightwood, were lifted Tuesday evening, according to the San Bernardino County Fire Protection District.

“The threats to the communities are gone, for now,” said Joe Rosa, the public information officer for California Interagency Incident Management Team 14, which has taken command of the Sheep fire. But he said a shift in weather — though not predicted for the next 24 hours — could change that risk.

Firefighters continued to increase containment of the blaze, according to a statement by the Angeles National Forest late Wednesday night.

“Earlier today, hotshot crews alongside helicopter water drops were able to extinguish a few hotspots near the south end of the fire,” the statement read. “While infrared flights continue to show scattered heat and interior heat within the fire perimeter, some remaining interior heat islands are expected to burn out.”

Crews were to continue searching for hotspots and monitoring fire behavior overnight Wednesday, according to the statement.

Rosa said about 600 firefighters continue to battle the blaze. The reported size of the fire, 865 acres, is down from initial estimates of 990 acres. Rosa said better mapping Tuesday night provided a more accurate scope of the fire.

“The biggest challenge throughout this whole incident has been the winds, and some of the topography,” Rosa said.

He said that because of cliffs and unstable rocky spots, it hasn’t been safe to put crews on the ground in some areas of the fire, which correspond with many of the areas not yet contained.

No structures have been damaged or lost in the fire, Rosa said. Officials with the state Department of Transportation worked to replace some guardrails along Highway 2, and crews with Southern California Edison are expected to replace some damaged poles Thursday, Rosa said.

Earlier Wednesday, Caltrans reopened the closed portion of Highway 2 between Wright Mountain Road and Desert Front Road, according to the Angeles National Forest’s statement.

“Fire crews and cooperators will continue to work near the roadway, please use caution when driving through the area,” the statement read.

Since Saturday, officials described a challenging firefight with dense vegetation, steep terrain and high and erratic winds, made more difficult by soaring temperatures and a drought-dried landscape primed to burn.

By Tuesday, conditions became a bit more favorable, said San Bernardino County Fire Department Battalion Chief Mike McClintock. He said reporting crews were no longer seeing active fire growth.

But high temperatures and potential winds could remain a threat for the Sheep fire, said Miguel Miller, a forecaster with National Weather Service in San Diego, which covers the San Bernardino area.

“Right now it’s kind of a good news, bad news,” Miller said Wednesday. “The bad news is it’s quite hot and quite dry over that fire right now. The good news is the winds are quite light.”

Miller said that heat, with highs expected around 90 degrees near the fire, is expected to last through Thursday, until an expected low-pressure system moves in Friday. He said that although that system could bring lower temperatures and more humidity — good for the firefighting — it could also bring much stronger winds, an added challenge.

Rosa said he is hopeful the weather will cool off and winds won’t get too bad, which will “help get crews into place to get this thing wrapped up here, hopefully before too long.”

Rosa’s team has estimated the Sheep fire will be contained by June 22, though he said that could quickly change depending on a number of factors.

“Crews are making really good progress,” Rosa said. “The crews that were initially on scene and worked this fire … did a phenomenal job keeping the fire where it’s at. They did really good work to keep the fire spread at a minimum.”

The South Coast Air Quality Management District had issued a smoke advisory warning of potentially unhealthful conditions in areas near the fire, but that expired Tuesday night.

The cause of the fire remains under investigation, the Forest Service said.

Times staff writer Gregory Yee contributed to this report.

For more information about the Sheep fire, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

California warned of critical fire weather danger as interior swelters in high heat | Corona, CA

A large swath of the interior of California was warned of wildfire danger and high heat on Tuesday.

Red flag warnings of critical fire weather conditions were in effect in the Sacramento Valley and foothills of the coastal range and the Sierra Nevada due to northerly winds and low relative humidity, the Sacramento weather office said.

The National Weather Service also said much of the same area would be under a heat advisory from noon Tuesday until 11 p.m. Wednesday. Predicted high temperatures ranged from 95 degrees to 105 degrees.

Heat advisories will extend south through the San Joaquin Valley on Wednesday.

“Today into Wednesday the weather will be hot, dry and windy,” the National Weather Service’s Sacramento office tweeted Tuesday. “There is a Red Flag Warning in effect through Wednesday morning.”

The San Francisco Bay Area was not under the advisories, but forecasts called for hot and dry weather Tuesday, with near-critical fire conditions in the North Bay interior mountains and the East Bay hills.

Tuesday, Southern California fire investigators were seeking the cause of a blaze that destroyed a large home and five rental cabins near Lake Arrowhead in the San Bernardino Mountains.

About three-quarters of an acre burned in the Hook Creek area on Monday, the San Bernardino County Fire Department said in a statement.

The two-story home and the cabins were vacant at the time, and there were no injuries to firefighters or citizens, the department said.

Last week, a fire near the community of Dunnigan, northwest of Sacramento in Yolo County, surged through 120 acres of grassland before it was contained Friday afternoon.

In the Sierra Nevada foothills, the Golden Fire prompted some evacuations and closed State Route 49, known as the Golden Chain Highway, south of the small town of Camptonville.

Yuba County authorities said the fire reached 26 acres before it was stopped from spreading and was 20% contained. The fire started in a building and spread to the wildlands, authorities said. No other buildings were damaged.

Tahoe National Forest reported that federal, state and local crews were battling the flames.

And on May 11, a destructive wildfire erupted in the coastal community of Laguna Niguel, burning at least 20 multimillion-dollar homes as it grew to 199 acres.

Various utilities’ electrical equipment has repeatedly been linked to the ignition of disastrous California wildfires, especially during windy weather. Southern California Edison has advised state utility regulators that unspecified electrical “circuit activity” occurred around the time a destructive wildfire erupted in the coastal community.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

For more information about grilling fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

It’s Time to Break Out the Grill | Corona, CA

Now that we are filled with beautiful springtime weather, many of us are beginning to plan our first grilled meals with friends and family. From a campfire breakfast to extra-thick steaks, no matter the time, a bright sunny day is a reason to strike up the ol’ BBQ.

But with these happy times comes with a few precautions. We know that it is supposed to be a good time to be had by all, and not some strict gathering, but these aren’t rules that will change the way you celebrate. Fire safety may seem unnecessary, but there are things we need to keep in mind in order to protect our loved ones from any fire accidents. After all, this is an open flame we’re dealing with – things can happen in a blink of an eye. Here are some tips to ensuring that this season’s BBQs are filled with nothing but happy faces and full bellies:

  • Use only charcoal lighter fluid to start a fire.
  • Once coals are ignited, never add more charcoal lighter fuel or other flammable/petroleum-based products to the fire – the container may explode in your hand!
  • Dispose of used coals in proper containers.
  • Be sure propane grills have the correct setting when being installed.
  • Use grills at least 10 feet away from your house.
  • Keep children and pets away from grills when in use.
  • Dispose of hot coals in proper receptacles – buried coals retain heat for up to 24 hours and may cause a serious burn injury to an unsuspecting passerby who steps on them.

For more information about grilling fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Spring Has Sprung! Make Your Home Fire Safe | Corona, CA

Springtime is a renewing time of year. We shed all the winter off and begin to prepare for sunnier days and warmer nights. One way we celebrate this refreshing time of year is by spring cleaning. Tossing out the old and welcoming in a new, cleaner time of year. So, while you are reorganizing your closets and preparing for a lighter, brighter season, keep in mind some of these fire safety tips:

Smoke and Carbon Monoxide alarms. These are our first line of defense against house fires, so it is important that you test alarms monthly and replace batteries as needed.

Kitchen. Keep countertops and stovetops free of grease and clutter that can easily catch fire, like oven mitts, towels, or wooden utensils.

Electrical cords. Take the time to check all electrical cords in your home for wear and tear.

Clothes dryers. Excess lint in the dryer is the number one cause of clothes dryer fires, so make sure to use a lint filter and clean it regularly.

Grilling. Keeping a grill clean from grease and fat not only prevents fires, but helps food cook better. Check the propane tank, hose, and all connection points for leaks. If you have a charcoal grill, use only charcoal starter fluid.

Fire escape plan. No one wants to be involved in a house fire, but accidents happen all the time. Being prepared is the number one way to not only look after you and your loved ones but keeping calm whilst doing so. Create a fire escape plan, including a map of each home level with two escape routes in each room. Discuss and practice the plan with everyone in the household. The more you’re prepared, the safer your will be.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Huntington Beach Firefighters Battle 2 Separate Structure Fires at Condo Complex, Historic Site | Corona, CA

BY SARA CARDINE | STAFF WRITER FEB. 25, 2022 5:50 PM PT

Huntington Beach firefighters were kept busy Friday morning, as one blaze damaged a building on a historical property off Warner Avenue and a four-alarm fire displaced five residents at a gated condo complex on the city’s south side.

Jennifer Carey, the city’s public affairs manager, said a call came in shortly after 10:45 p.m. Thursday at Seabridge Village, a gated residential complex on the 20100 block of Sealpoint Lane, where a fire that started in the garage of a three-story unit had extended to other residences.

More than 60 firefighters — including some from Costa Mesa, Newport Beach, Fountain Valley, Orange, Anaheim and the Orange County Fire Authority — responded to the four-alarm fire inside the complex, according to Carey. It wasn’t until about 2 a.m. that the last flames were doused.

No injuries were sustained but three separate units were damaged during the incident, and at least five adult residents were displaced after their homes were declared uninhabitable, Carey said. Red Cross was called to the scene to assist the victims.

A second report of a fire was logged by HBPD shortly before 9 a.m. Friday at the intersection of Warner Avenue and Nichols Lane, on a property that has been identified by local preservationists as a place of historic significance.

The 4.4-acre parcel contains several buildings with ties to the city’s early Japanese American history, including the former Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church — founded as a mission in 1904 — a barn and three residences that date as far back as 1912, when Japanese native Charles Mitsuji Furuta (1888-1953) built a home for his family, according to a historical report filed with the city in 2002.

At Nichols Lane and Warner Avenue in Huntington Beach lies the Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church, founded in 1904.

An abandoned church at Nichols Lane and Warner Avenue in Huntington Beach is the former site of the Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church, founded in 1904. A fire broke out in a building near the church Friday morning.

Members of the Furuta family in 2004 sold the property and the six structures on it to Rainbow Environmental Services, now Republic Services, which at one point was interested in selling to a self-storage company.

Although the city created the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Task Force in 2012 to collect funds for the relocation or restoration of the site, the group was disbanded by the Huntington Beach City Council five years later without having attained its goal.

Carey said Friday firefighters responding to the incident noticed a fire had broken out in an ancillary building adjacent to the main church building. They were able to put out the blaze in about 20 minutes, preventing flames from reaching the other structures, including the church.

Separate investigations into what caused the two structure fires are currently underway.

For more information about fire news updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

How Are You Protecting Your Home from Fire? | Corona, CA

fire extinguisher training

Believe it or not, but there is an average of 358,000 house fires every year, and these fires lead to more than 3,000 deaths. Those are rather frightening statistics. Because while a house fire seems pretty common, there are a few ways to prevent them from occurring.

Unfortunately, most of these fires could be prevented by just paying attention to what you’re doing, because most of these fires occur in the kitchen while cooking. Having some basic fire suppression tools around can help if and when a fire breaks out in your home. One is a fire extinguisher. Because many of these fires begin in the kitchen, having an extinguisher handy is a great way to put out a quick flareup.

Another great tool to have in your home is the trusty smoke detector. Because fires can arise from things like space heaters or irons left on, it is important to have these placed in various rooms in your home. While they don’t do anything to extinguish the fire, they will make everyone in the house aware that a fire has started and to get to safety as quickly as safely as possible.

Lastly, the fire sprinkler. Many homeowners believe that a smoke detector is the only real necessity in protecting their home from fire, but a sprinkler system will not only extinguish a fire quicker than a fire extinguisher but can detect it sooner because it is triggered by a rise in the air’s temperature. One it is set off, the sprinkler sprays the entire area down, thereby preventing any large losses or damages that just having a smoke detector will create.

It may seem excessive, but isn’t your home and family’s safety worth it?

For more information about fire suppression tools, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.