Category Archives: Seasonal Fire Safety

Keeping Your Cords Sorted | Corona, CA

Do you have more electric appliances than you have sockets? Are you solving this issue by overloading your extension cords? With the holidays coming up, it is time to trim the tree and deck the halls but keeping your loved ones safe is a top priority. Here are some tips to keep in mind as you celebrate the holidays the most festive ways possible:

  • When buying cords, look for those tested and approved.
  • Don’t overload extension cords with too many appliances – check the maximum capacity guidelines.
  • Plug major appliances directly into a wall outlet.
  • Fully insert all plugs into the outlet.
  • Unplug cords when you’re not using them.
  • Don’t use extension cords as permanent wiring.
  • Avoid running cords through water or snow to avoid the high risk of electric shock.
  • Don’t run cords through ceilings, walls, doorways, or under carpets.
  • Keep cords out of the way to prevent tripping.
  • If you use too many extension cords, consider installing more outlets.
  • Avoid chaining multiple extension cords.
  • Never use indoor extension cords outdoors. Only use the cords marked for outdoor use.
  • If a cord heats up or is damaged in any way, discard it.
  • Always use cords with polarized and/or three-prong plugs or force a fit.
  • When using cord-bundling devices, such as spiral wire wrap, avoid cramming cords together to prevent damaging the cord’s insulation.
  • Never use staples or nails to attach cords to a surface to avoid damaging the insulation.

It is important that you design a fire escape plan in case any accidental fires arise. Having smoke detectors and fire extinguishers will also be beneficial. Having these simple things in place will not only prevent property damage but will also keep you calm if there ever was an emergency.

For more information about extension cord safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

After California’s 3rd-largest wildfire, deer returned home while trees were ‘still smoldering’ | Corona, CA

Michelle Ma – UW News | October 28, 2021

When a massive wildfire tears through a landscape, what happens to the animals?

While many animals have adapted to live with wildfires of the past — which were smaller, more frequent and kept ecosystems in balance across the West — it’s unclear to scientists how animals are coping with today’s unprecedented megafires. More than a century of fire suppression coupled with climate change has produced wildfires that are now bigger and more severe than before.

In a rare stroke of luck, researchers from the University of Washington, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of California, Santa Barbara, were able to track a group of black-tailed deer during and after California’s third-largest wildfire, the 2018 Mendocino Complex Fire. The megafire, which torched more than 450,000 acres in northern California, burned across half of an established study site, making it possible to record the movements and feeding patterns of deer before, during and after the fire. The results were published Oct. 28 in the journal Ecology and Evolution.

“We don’t have much information on what animals do while the flames are burning, or in the immediate days that follow after wildfires,” said co-lead author Kaitlyn Gaynor, a postdoctoral researcher at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis at UC Santa Barbara. “It was kind of a happy accident that we were able to see what these animals were doing during the wildfire and right after, when it was still just a desolate landscape.”

The researchers were surprised by what they learned. Of the 18 deer studied, all survived. Deer that had to flee the flames returned home, despite some areas of the landscape being completely burned and void of vegetation to eat. Most of the deer returned home within hours of the fire, while trees were still smoldering.

Having access to this location information — from previously placed wildlife cameras and GPS collars — is rare when studying how animals respond to extreme and unpredictable events, like megafires.

“There are very few studies that aim to understand the short-term, immediate responses of animals to wildfires. When a fire sweeps through and dramatically changes the landscape, its impact in those initial days is undervalued and absent in the published literature,” said co-lead author Samantha Kreling, a doctoral student at the UW School of Environmental and Forest Sciences.

The study took place northwest of Sacramento at the University of California’s Hopland Research and Extension Center, where the researchers were studying the movements of black-tailed deer. Before the Mendocino Complex Fire started, the team had placed tracking collars on 18 deer and positioned several dozen motioned-activated wildlife cameras across the area.

On July 27, 2018, the research team based in Hopland saw smoke nearby. Within hours, they were told to leave immediately and not return to the property, as large flames swept through. In total, a little over half of the research center’s land was burned by the Mendocino Complex Fire that was, at the time, California’s largest wildfire.

Kreling, who needed data from the site for her senior-year undergraduate thesis at UC Berkeley, decided to pivot — or, in the words of her collaborators, “turn lemons into lemonade.” The wildlife tracking technology and photos allowed Kreling and co-authors instead to look at how deer change their use of space during and immediately after large disturbances like wildfires, and how this event influenced their body condition and survival.

“Seeing the drastic changes on the landscape got me wondering what it’s like for animals on the land to actually deal with the repercussions of having an event like this sweep through,” Kreling said. “Having the infrastructure in place was very useful to see what happened before, compared to what happened after.”

Despite the challenges of having little to eat, all of the deer returned soon after the fire. Deer from burned areas had to work harder and travel farther to find green vegetation, and researchers noticed a decline in body condition in some of these animals. Still, their loyalty to home is a tactic that likely helped this species survive past wildfires.

It’s unknown whether this loyalty-to-home strategy will prove helpful, or harmful, in the future. Smaller wildfires encourage new vegetation growth — tasty for deer — but massive wildfires can actually destroy seed banks, which reduces the amount of plants available to eat. In this case, some of the deer that had to expand their home range to eat did so at the expense of their body condition.

“These deer have evolved this behavioral strategy that has clearly worked for them, but the big question mark is, as fires get more intense and frequent, will this behavior actually trap animals in these habitats that are seeing massive disturbances on the scale of nothing that has happened before in their evolutionary history,” Gaynor said.

The specific patterns observed with these deer likely can’t be applied to other large mammals in different regions, the authors said. But it’s an interesting case study to explore what extreme disturbances, like large wildfires, might mean for animals. Meanwhile, co-author Kendall Calhoun, a doctoral student at UC Berkeley, is continuing to look at the long-term effects of the fire on the health and reproductive capacity of this population of deer, which is still being tracked.

Other co-authors are Alex McInturff and Justin Brashares at UC Berkeley. This research was funded by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife. For more information, contact Kreling at skreling@uw.edu and Gaynor at gaynor@nceas.ucsb.edu.

For more information about fire escape plans, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Preparing for a Fire: Fire Escape Edition | Corona, CA

When we think of fire safety, we generally keep it to the basics – fire extinguishers handy, smoke alarms installed, and flammable items kept from open flames. But there is one precaution that tends to be overlooked, and it can really lead to an issue if a house fire ever arises: a fire escape plan.

Yes, it may seem a bit overwhelming, but it really is a simple process that will protect everyone in your home. Because believe it or not but preparedness is key to staying calm and safe during the stress of a house fire. The more you and your loved ones are aware, the less chance someone gets hurt, and that’s really what’s important. According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) survey, one-third of households have a fire escape plan and feel they are prepared because drills have been practiced. Here are a few tips to keep in mind as you prepare your family for any future fires:

An easy way to convey fire escape routes is to draw up a layout of your home. Make sure to notate doors, windows and fire alarms. As you figure out two escape options for each room and a meeting point outside to ensure everyone is out and safe, add these to your plan and hang it somewhere everyone can see.

Twice a year, practice these escape routes, both at night and during the day. The more you’re prepared, the easier it will be to think calmly during a scary moment. At the same time, make sure your doors and windows are easy to open so there won’t be an issue. There may be a time when smoke is filling your way exit, so also practice crawling towards the exit.

For more information about fire escape plans, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Autumn Fire Safety Tips for Your Home | Corona, CA

As the summer days dwindle away and the cooler nights start to make their way into our lives, it is a time that we prepare ourselves, and our homes, for the colder months that lie ahead. We are switching off the air conditioner in exchange for a heater or fireplace if we aren’t properly prepared, it can lead to trouble down the road. So, for you and your family to be well-prepared for the upcoming weather, here are a few tips to keep in mind during these chillier months:

Smoke detectors/alarms. Being in a wildfire zone is a tough place to be during these later months, so it is imperative that our home stays on alert. Test your smoke detectors and alarms to make sure they are in working order.

Heating devices. As we get chillier, we make our homes warmer. Give your HVAC a quick inspection and change any filters necessary, leave at least three feet around your space heaters, clean your chimney and make sure to have a screen around your fireplace to ensure ultimate safety.

Garden maintenance. Now that we’ve considered the inside of your home, let’s take a look at how to protect yourself from the outside. Rain gutters and roofs should be kept free of autumn’s gorgeous falling leaves because they are dry and can easily catch fire. In fact, your entire yard should be maintained in order to keep the drier debris away from your home.

Fire escape routes. This may seem like a given, but many homes do not have a fire escape plan. Making sure that your family knows what to do in fire will be key to not only their safety but to prevent panic from happening. Knowledge is key to calmness in chaos.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Chaparral Fire: Evacuations in Effect as Fire Burns in North San Diego County | Corona, CA

By: City News Service Posted at 10:51 AM, Aug 30, 2021 and last updated 2:24 PM, Aug 30, 2021

SAN DIEGO (CNS) — A brush fire straddling San Diego and Riverside counties had burned 1,500 acres and was 13% contained Monday, with some evacuation orders remaining in place along with a smoke advisory.

The wildfire started at 25 acres near the edge of the Cleveland National Forest on Saturday afternoon near Tenaja and Cleveland Forest roads. It exploded to 1,427 acres by 2:30 p.m. Monday. The Riverside County Fire Department reported that one firefighter has suffered minor injuries and two structures were destroyed.

Evacuation orders were in place for areas north of the Tenaja Truck Trail, south of Calle Cielo, east of Calle Collado and west of Calle Be Bietol, according to the Riverside County Fire Department. Evacuation warning were also in place for those north of Tenaja Road, west of Calle Pino/Gallop Lane, south of Hombre Lane and west of Cleveland National Forest Road.

An evacuation center was established at Murrieta Valley High School, 42200 Nighthawk Way, fire officials said.

Small animals can be taken to Animal Friends of the Valleys, 33751 Mission Trail in Wildomar. Large animals can be taken to the San Jacinto Animal Shelter, 581 S. Grand Ave., in San Jacinto.

Firefighters were battling the flames from the ground and air, including the use of four air tankers. Fire crews from the U.S. Forest Service, Murrieta, Hemet and Corona were assisting the 150 firefighters from San Diego and Riverside counties.

The Orange County Fire Authority tweeted a picture of one of its helicopters making a water drop over a home. The smoke could be seen from Orange and San Diego counties.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

How Can I Extinguish this Fire? | Corona, CA

During the summer, we are all more apt to plan our activities outside in the gorgeous warm weather. And many of these activities are going to include fire. BBQs, campfires and fireworks displays are some of the key factors to a fantastic summer.

But there is another side to this summertime fun – fire safety. Because while fire is a key component to our summers, it is important to be safe with said fire. After all, wildfires are becoming a main character here in on the west coast. So, it is important for everyone to be safe and put out the fires before you leave or go to bed for the night. Here are the ways a fire can be extinguished to keep your summer fun safe.

Cooling. It is a good idea to have a bucket of water handy for extinguishing a small fire, like a BBQ or a campfire. Because the water is a coolant, it instantly kills the heat and prevents from spreading. Before you head to bed for the night, be sure to put out the fire so no accidents happen while you sleep.

Smothering. Another alternative to killing a fire is to smother it. When you smother a fire, you basically block out any oxygen from reaching it. And just like us, a fire needs oxygen to breathe.

Starving. Starving a fire is more to do with preventative measures than extinguishing a summer fire. These firebreaks will cause fires to stop in its tracks as there is nowhere else to go.

Interrupting. When you have a chemical fire, water isn’t going to work. In fact, it will make it worse. Using a fire extinguisher will help by suffocating the chemical chain reaction.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

What to Know About the Dixie Fire | Corona, CA

Tuesday: Although it rained on Monday, fire season is well underway. And the state’s biggest blaze is burning near areas scarred from the Camp Fire.

By Jill Cowan | July 27, 2021

Good morning.

There may have been rare July showers in parts of California on Monday. But make no mistake: The drought is still a threat. And fire season is underway.

The Dixie Fire, California’s largest wildfire this year, continued to burn through thousands of acres of rough terrain, prompting evacuation orders and threatening communities in a region scarred by the memory of the 2018 Camp Fire, the deadliest in the state’s history.

More than 5,400 firefighters were battling the Dixie Fire, which merged over the weekend with another nearby blaze, the Fly Fire, and had burned through about 200,000 acres, according to Cal Fire, the state’s fire agency.

That’s an area a little larger than New York City, and about half of the acreage burned by the Bootleg Fire in southern Oregon, the nation’s largest this year. But the Bootleg Fire is burning in a more remote area; 300 people live within five miles of that blaze, according to The New York Times’s wildfire tracker, compared with 4,900 within five miles of the Dixie Fire.

The Dixie Fire started more than a week ago, just a couple of miles from the spot where the Camp Fire ignited, said Rick Carhart, a spokesman for Cal Fire in Butte County. That fire killed more than 80 people and all but leveled the remote town of Paradise.

“There really is so much — there’s no other word for it — PTSD,” Mr. Carhart said. “There’s so much anxiety.”

A stream of firefighting helicopters taking off from a nearby airport in recent days has flown over Magalia, a community that was also devastated by the Camp Fire. Residents there are out of the path of this year’s flames, Mr. Carhart said — but are still afraid.

“They see a helicopter with a bucket attached,” he said. “And it’s, ‘Oh my God, here we go again.’”

The two blazes also bear another chilling similarity: Pacific Gas & Electric, the state’s largest utility, said last week that blown fuses on one of its utility poles may have sparked the Dixie Fire. PG&E pleaded guilty last year to 84 counts of involuntary manslaughter for its role in starting the Camp Fire.

Mr. Carhart said that crews have been making progress in controlling the Dixie Fire, and the weather has been more cooperative in recent days than fire officials had predicted. Nevertheless, the size and timing of the blaze — which he said is already the 15th-largest in California’s recorded history — point to a future in which fires won’t be limited to a single season.

“One of the most concerning things about it is how early in the year it is,” Mr. Carhart.

Last year’s record-breaking wildfire season, during which millions of acres burned across California and the West, actually had a below-average start, he said, until widespread lightning strikes ignited tinder-dry vegetation in many remote areas.

Right now, Mr. Carhart said, the thousands of firefighters who are cutting fire lines, dousing hot spots or doing any of the other time-consuming, physically demanding work required of them, are looking at months before there’s likely to be rain, which heralds an end to the most intense fire activity.

In the past, he said, he might have expected a blaze like the Dixie Fire sometime in September — not July.

“We’re all kind of learning that fire season isn’t a three-month or six-month thing anymore,” he said.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Wildfire Season Is Here: Hardening Your House | Corona, CA

With the warmer days, comes the danger of wildfires here in California. It’s a bittersweet kind of season – fantastic for summer fun in the sun, but always a looming stress about the wildfires that ravage our homes every year. Because your home is susceptible to flyaway embers from fires close by, here are a few ways you can prepare your home, in case wildfire strikes:

Roof. The most vulnerable part of your home, roofs with wood or shingle roofs are at high risk of being destroyed during a wildfire. Use materials such as composition, metal, clay or tile. Block any spaces between roof decking and clear rain gutters to prevent embers from catching and remove accumulated vegetative debris from the roof.

Windows. Install dual-paned windows with one pane of tempered glass to reduce the chance of breakage in a fire and install screens in all usable windows to increase ember resistance and decrease radiant heat exposure.

Walls. Wood products, such as boards, panels or shingles, are flammable and not good choices for fire-prone areas. Instead, use stucco, fiber cement wall siding, fire retardant, treated wood, or other approved materials.

Chimney. Cover your chimney and stovepipe outlets with a non-flammable screen. When not in use, close the fireplace flue.

Garage. Have a fire extinguisher and tools such as a shovel, rake, bucket, and hose available for fire emergencies. Also, install weather stripping to prevent flying embers from blowing in.

Fences. Best practice is to separate your fence from your house or upgrade the last 5-feet of the fence to a noncombustible material to reduce the chance of the fence from bringing fire to your home.

For more information about home hardening tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Brush Fire in San Bernardino National Forest Stopped at 34 Acres, Temporarily Closes Highway 18 | Corona, CA

By RUBY GONZALES | rugonzales@scng.com and QUINN WILSON | qwilson@scng.com | San Gabriel Valley Tribune PUBLISHED: June 28, 2021 at 1:09 p.m. | UPDATED: June 28, 2021 at 6:54 p.m.

Firefighters on the ground, along with helicopters and planes, battled a brush fire on Monday, June 28, that started when a car crashed near Old Waterman Canyon Road in San Bernardino, temporarily shut down Highway 18 and burned 34 acres.

Update 1: Closure remains in place on SR-18 from 40th to 138 due to #PeakFire. Commuters must use other available routes to get up and down the mountain. It is unknown when closure will lift. #Caltrans8

— Caltrans District 8 (@Caltrans8) June 29, 2021

One firefighter suffered heat injury and was taken to a hospital.

The fire was burning in the forest, said Zach Behrens, a spokesman for the San Bernardino National Forest. There were no evacuations, he added.

The fire’s forward progress was stopped around 1:43 p.m., according to National Forest officials. By around 5:15 p.m., crews had reached 10 percent containment on the blaze.

#PeakFire update: now approximately 24 acres. Highway 18 closure is now in effect from Highway 138 down to 40th street. pic.twitter.com/7YKkN1pgs7

— San Bernardino National Forest (@SanBernardinoNF) June 28, 2021

The fire was reported around 10:50 a.m. off of Old Waterman Canyon Road. It headed west upslope, crossed Highway 18 and moved at a rapid rate, Behrens said.

The fire was determined to be ignited by a single-car crash involving a BMW that quickly spread to the adjacent vegetation, according to Lisa Cox, spokeswoman for the National Forest.

“This is a great opportunity to remind people that parking the side of the road where there’s any vegetation at all is not a good idea,” Cox said. “Of course, accidents happen, but if you ever need to pull over be sure to use one of the paved turnouts along highways like (Highway 18).”

Cox said firefighters responded to the initial call regarding the fire, then learned about the car crash. It was not immediately clear if anyone was injured in the crash or the subsequent car fire.

Authorities closed Highway 18, between 40th Street in San Bernardino and Highway 138 in Crestline. The upbound lanes were expected to be fully reopened at 8 p.m. while downbound will have one lane open through Tuesday morning, June 29, Caltrans said.

UPDATE: Upbound 18 will open fully at 8pm tonight. Downbound 18 will have one lane open at 8 pm tonight until further notice. At least through tomorrow morning. https://t.co/ztEmYA2MzV

— Caltrans District 8 (@Caltrans8) June 29, 2021

Behrens said 150 firefighters responded along with five helicopters and nine fixed-wing aircraft.

For more information about fire safety tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Tips to Prevent a Summer Fire Issue | Corona, CA

Now that we are beginning to get back into the social events of the summertime, it is important to remember that there are many fire hazards that take place specifically during these hot summer months. So, before you take off for that camping trip or spark up that BBQ, take a look at some fire safety tips to ensure that your summer celebrations go off without injury of loss of personal property.

Camping trips. If you are setting off to spend some quality time in nature, make sure to pack a fire extinguisher in case your campfire gets a bit out of control. Ensure the location of your fire is clean and free of any grassy areas, hanging tree branches or dry brush nearby. Gather small bits of tinder to spark your fire, then use larger pieces of wood to keep the fire going. Once you are ready for bed, douse the fire with water and sand so an accident isn’t going to happen while you sleep.

BBQs. Especially with the 4th of July upon us, BBQs are some of the best ways to celebrate our country’s birthday. Like social distancing, it is important to keep a three-foot distance between the grill and other objects or people that could be harmed if an ember goes rogue. If you use a gas grill, check for leaks. If you prefer charcoal, make sure you keep things outdoors to avoid CO2 poisoning.

Natural disasters. Summertime is the time of year lightning strikes run rampant. Avoid any natural disasters by keeping your landscaping tidy and your gutters clear.

For more information about fire safety tips, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.