California bracing for what could be another bad fire season. What to expect as weather warms up | Corona, CA

Jessica Skropanic | Redding Record Searchlight

Much of California is already in wildfire season after an extremely dry winter left vegetation brittle and water levels low. With winds and hot temperatures in the forecast starting this week, and no rain or snow expected in the near future, conditions aren’t likely to improve, fire experts said.

Statewide, firefighters battled 925 fires from Jan. 1 to April 1 — about the same as those dates in 2021, according to the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. However, the acreage destroyed this year is almost double what burned during those months last year.

“Most of the state is already in moderate to extreme drought,” said Cheryl Buliavac, fire prevention specialist at Cal Fire’s Shasta-Trinity Unit. This year’s fire season could be worse than last year’s.

By Saturday, winds pick up to 40 mph and weekday heat will have dried out the North State, pushing fire danger to what the weather service considers moderate levels.

“Vegetation is as dry now as it would be in a normal year in mid-June,” Buliavac said. That’s in part because precipitation forecasted over winter didn’t arrive or dropped less rain than expected.

It’s not just one dry season that’s making 2022 potentially worse for fire than 2021, said Karl Swanberg at the weather service in Sacramento. “It’s a combination of conditions overall.”

Some portions of the North State got more rain this winter than last year, he said.

15.44 inches of rain fell on Redding from Oct. 1, 2021, to April 6, 2022

13.27 inches fell from Oct. 1, 2020, to Sept. 30, 2021

What’s making 2022 worse is having two very dry years back-to-back, both well below the 28.54 inches of rain per year considered normal, Swanberg said. The cumulative effect is stretching out the fire season even longer.

Extremely windy conditions this winter further dried out thirsty trees and brush, Buliavac said. “It’s very concerning because we were under similar conditions the last few summers.” While fire danger is still present in Sacramento and the southern Sacramento Valley, that area appears slightly greener and less dry than the north valley, Swanberg said.

Snowpack levels dropped to 16% of their historic average throughout the Scott River sub-basin in the Klamath National Forest, west of Yreka, according to the U.S. Forest Service’s latest measurements, taken throughout the basin on April 1, when the snowpack is at its maximum.

Less snow means less water for communities and farmers — not only in Siskiyou County, but at lower elevations in Trinity and Shasta counties. The latter rely on meltwater to raise humidity levels and water vegetation. Without a good snowpack, there’s not enough slow meltwater running down the mountains into the valley, Buliavac said.

North coast forecast

Coastal residents are seeing fire risk grow starting this week, too. Temperatures soared into the high 80s, drying out the historically humid San Francisco Bay Area, according to the weather service.

This weekend, strong offshore winds will further dry vegetation, increasing the potential for fire starts and spreads.

Surrounding areas, including the North Bay, won’t fare better, the weather service said. Wind gusts out of the north and northeast could reach 70 mph over Napa and Contra Costa counties late Saturday into early Sunday.

Relief could come Monday, when up to half an inch of rain could fall, the weather service said, but warm dry spells and wild winds will likely visit again this year.

Further up the coast, inland areas such as Ukiah are reaching the low 90s. That’s definitely warm for April, said Jonathan Garner, meteorologist with the weather service in Eureka.

Vegetation is still green, so fire danger is less in the northwest corner of the state, he said.

Statewide in 2021, firefighters battled 8,835 fires that destroyed 2,568,948 acres. Nine of the 10 largest fires were in Northern California, including the 963,309-acre Dixie Fire which burned in five counties, the 223,124-acre Monument Fire in Trinity County and the 221,835-acre Caldor Fire east of Sacramento to Lake Tahoe.

How to prepare for fire season

Cal Fire encourages residents to prepare for fire season:

  • Property owners should consider creating defensible space early in the year, before temperatures soar. For more information go to the Cal Fire website at bit.ly/3x6ttzy.
  • Prepare a “go” bag in the event of an evacuation. If you never unpacked last year’s bag, replace anything that expired: Batteries, food, water, pet food, etc.
  • Make sure to plan two ways to get out of your home and two routes out of your neighborhood.

For more ways to prepare for fire season go to Cal Fire’s Ready for Wildfire website at readyforwildfire.org.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Spring Has Sprung! Make Your Home Fire Safe | Corona, CA

Springtime is a renewing time of year. We shed all the winter off and begin to prepare for sunnier days and warmer nights. One way we celebrate this refreshing time of year is by spring cleaning. Tossing out the old and welcoming in a new, cleaner time of year. So, while you are reorganizing your closets and preparing for a lighter, brighter season, keep in mind some of these fire safety tips:

Smoke and Carbon Monoxide alarms. These are our first line of defense against house fires, so it is important that you test alarms monthly and replace batteries as needed.

Kitchen. Keep countertops and stovetops free of grease and clutter that can easily catch fire, like oven mitts, towels, or wooden utensils.

Electrical cords. Take the time to check all electrical cords in your home for wear and tear.

Clothes dryers. Excess lint in the dryer is the number one cause of clothes dryer fires, so make sure to use a lint filter and clean it regularly.

Grilling. Keeping a grill clean from grease and fat not only prevents fires, but helps food cook better. Check the propane tank, hose, and all connection points for leaks. If you have a charcoal grill, use only charcoal starter fluid.

Fire escape plan. No one wants to be involved in a house fire, but accidents happen all the time. Being prepared is the number one way to not only look after you and your loved ones but keeping calm whilst doing so. Create a fire escape plan, including a map of each home level with two escape routes in each room. Discuss and practice the plan with everyone in the household. The more you’re prepared, the safer your will be.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

What Winter’s Dry Spell Means for California’s Fire Season | Corona, CA

This winter’s extreme rainfall and dryness might average out to near-normal levels of precipitation. But that’s no insurance policy against fire, scientists say.

By Livia Albeck-Ripka | March 1, 2022

When rain pummeled California in October, many breathed a sigh of relief: At least in some parts of the state, the worst of the fire season, experts said, was most likely over. The following month, however, precipitation was scarce. In December, it rained again, smashing records. Now, some parts of the state have barely seen another drop of water since early January.

“It has been both an unusually dry and an unusually wet winter,” said Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles, and the Nature Conservancy.

But what do these ups and downs mean for California’s next fire season? The answer is complicated. Before October, a vast majority of California was considered to be in “exceptional” or “extreme” drought (the highest rankings, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor). So, when meteorological conditions known as “atmospheric rivers” drenched parts of the state in October and December, much of that water was sucked up by the parched landscape.

The hot and windy conditions that followed also led the rain to evaporate quickly, drying out the vegetation that fuels fires. California’s rising snowpack, which provides moisture to the ecosystem as it melts in the spring, has since plummeted.

Historically, California’s fire season lasted a few months during the hottest part of the year. But recently it has become more year-round. In January, typically one of California’s wettest months, a wildfire swept through Big Sur, a mountainous coastal region south of San Francisco, forcing hundreds of residents to evacuate. The scene was “pretty surreal” given California’s wet October and December, the National Weather Service said on Twitter at the time.

But though the extreme rainfall and dryness might average out to near-normal levels of precipitation, that’s no insurance policy against fire, scientists say. As global temperatures warm, even in wet years, hot weather can ultimately dry out vegetation to produce droughtlike conditions.

“We still get dry years and wet years, but we don’t really get cold years anymore,” Swain said. He added, “No matter what, everything still dries out.”

For now, the dry spell has a small silver lining. The lack of rain gives fire authorities more opportunity to conduct prescribed burns that help to reduce the worst impacts of fires during the summer. And fires that ignite spontaneously during these colder months are also likely to be less intense, and can help to avert worse fires in hot, dry conditions. But without rain in the coming days or weeks, the state could begin relapsing further into drought. Last year, historically low rainfall and ongoing drought helped cause a brutal fire season that lasted several months and burned 2.6 million acres.

“I don’t think March is going to somehow bail us out,” Swain said of the likelihood that generous rain in the coming weeks would help stave off intense fires this year.

“We’re seeing bad fire years almost every year,” he added.

For more information about CA fire season, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Is Your Office Fire Safe? | Corona, CA

Since the pandemic, many of us office workers have found themselves working from home, while others have returned to the office and their day-to-day back to normal. Because we are returning to a workplace for the majority of our days, it is important that it is safe from fire hazards. Not only to protect yourselves, but all the property housed within your workplace. Here are some simple tips to keeping your workdays safe:

Eliminate fire hazards. While we are slowly converting to an electronic office, there is still loads of paper products around. Ensure trash is emptied frequently to prevent buildup. Electronics can also lead to accidental fires. Do not use equipment that delivers a mild electrical shock, gives off unusual heat or smells odd. Use tools and equipment correctly and keep everything well maintained in order to prevent accidental fires. Keep your outlets safe from overload and electrical cords hidden so as not to become a tripping hazard.

Emergency preparation. It is important to know who to call if something happens within the office, like a building manager or security office. Make sure to have the numbers posted in various areas, so anyone can find them. If a fire or emergency arises, report it as soon as it happens to receive proper attention.

Evacuation procedure. Every building should have a fire exit in place. Make sure all employees know where to go in case evacuation is necessary.

General workplace fire safety. If you don’t work in an office environment, it’s still important to maintain your workspace. Make sure all walkways are kept clear, sweep up scraps of paper, debris and dust as soon as possible. Do not use electrical equipment when flammable gases, vapors, liquids, dust, or fibers are present. 

For more information about fire safety in the workplace, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Huntington Beach Firefighters Battle 2 Separate Structure Fires at Condo Complex, Historic Site | Corona, CA

BY SARA CARDINE | STAFF WRITER FEB. 25, 2022 5:50 PM PT

Huntington Beach firefighters were kept busy Friday morning, as one blaze damaged a building on a historical property off Warner Avenue and a four-alarm fire displaced five residents at a gated condo complex on the city’s south side.

Jennifer Carey, the city’s public affairs manager, said a call came in shortly after 10:45 p.m. Thursday at Seabridge Village, a gated residential complex on the 20100 block of Sealpoint Lane, where a fire that started in the garage of a three-story unit had extended to other residences.

More than 60 firefighters — including some from Costa Mesa, Newport Beach, Fountain Valley, Orange, Anaheim and the Orange County Fire Authority — responded to the four-alarm fire inside the complex, according to Carey. It wasn’t until about 2 a.m. that the last flames were doused.

No injuries were sustained but three separate units were damaged during the incident, and at least five adult residents were displaced after their homes were declared uninhabitable, Carey said. Red Cross was called to the scene to assist the victims.

A second report of a fire was logged by HBPD shortly before 9 a.m. Friday at the intersection of Warner Avenue and Nichols Lane, on a property that has been identified by local preservationists as a place of historic significance.

The 4.4-acre parcel contains several buildings with ties to the city’s early Japanese American history, including the former Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church — founded as a mission in 1904 — a barn and three residences that date as far back as 1912, when Japanese native Charles Mitsuji Furuta (1888-1953) built a home for his family, according to a historical report filed with the city in 2002.

At Nichols Lane and Warner Avenue in Huntington Beach lies the Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church, founded in 1904.

An abandoned church at Nichols Lane and Warner Avenue in Huntington Beach is the former site of the Wintersburg Japanese Presbyterian Church, founded in 1904. A fire broke out in a building near the church Friday morning.

Members of the Furuta family in 2004 sold the property and the six structures on it to Rainbow Environmental Services, now Republic Services, which at one point was interested in selling to a self-storage company.

Although the city created the Historic Wintersburg Preservation Task Force in 2012 to collect funds for the relocation or restoration of the site, the group was disbanded by the Huntington Beach City Council five years later without having attained its goal.

Carey said Friday firefighters responding to the incident noticed a fire had broken out in an ancillary building adjacent to the main church building. They were able to put out the blaze in about 20 minutes, preventing flames from reaching the other structures, including the church.

Separate investigations into what caused the two structure fires are currently underway.

For more information about fire news updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

How Are You Protecting Your Home from Fire? | Corona, CA

fire extinguisher training

Believe it or not, but there is an average of 358,000 house fires every year, and these fires lead to more than 3,000 deaths. Those are rather frightening statistics. Because while a house fire seems pretty common, there are a few ways to prevent them from occurring.

Unfortunately, most of these fires could be prevented by just paying attention to what you’re doing, because most of these fires occur in the kitchen while cooking. Having some basic fire suppression tools around can help if and when a fire breaks out in your home. One is a fire extinguisher. Because many of these fires begin in the kitchen, having an extinguisher handy is a great way to put out a quick flareup.

Another great tool to have in your home is the trusty smoke detector. Because fires can arise from things like space heaters or irons left on, it is important to have these placed in various rooms in your home. While they don’t do anything to extinguish the fire, they will make everyone in the house aware that a fire has started and to get to safety as quickly as safely as possible.

Lastly, the fire sprinkler. Many homeowners believe that a smoke detector is the only real necessity in protecting their home from fire, but a sprinkler system will not only extinguish a fire quicker than a fire extinguisher but can detect it sooner because it is triggered by a rise in the air’s temperature. One it is set off, the sprinkler sprays the entire area down, thereby preventing any large losses or damages that just having a smoke detector will create.

It may seem excessive, but isn’t your home and family’s safety worth it?

For more information about fire suppression tools, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Mr. T’s Restaurant Building in Downtown Riverside a ‘Total Loss’ After Latest Fire | Corona, CA

By BRIAN ROKOS | brokos@scng.com | The Press-Enterprise

The latest fire at the iconic but shuttered Mr. T’s restaurant in downtown Riverside might be its last.

More than 30 firefighters battled the blaze at 4307 Main St. after it was reported at 6:29 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 25. Firefighters quickly searched the building and didn’t find anyone. By 10:30 a.m., Riverside city code enforcement officials and the owner were making plans to knock the chimney into the structure so it wouldn’t fall on anybody.

“The structure is severely compromised. This building is a total loss,” Battalion Chief Bruce Vanderhorst said.

It was the fourth or fifth fire at the A-framed restaurant, he said, adding that it closed around 2019 after a kitchen fire. The city in 2020 issued a permit to the owner, listed as J & P Canaan, to fix the damage. But that permit expired without any repairs being performed, city spokesman Phil Pitchford said.

The building was later boarded up, but that didn’t prevent break-ins. Tuesday, Vanderhorst said he asked for police to respond quickly when a transient tried to re-enter the building to retrieve his belongings.

An arson investigator determined the fire was not intentionally set, but the exact cause was listed as undetermined, Vanderhorst said. No one was reported injured. Main Street was closed for hours after the fire between 12th and 14th streets.

The 1,958-square-foot, $35,000 building opened as an International House of Pancakes, according to the building permit issued in 1963. It was unclear Tuesday when the name was changed to Mr. T’s.

Vanderhorst said firefighters from the downtown station sometimes drove their rigs to the restaurant and ate Sunday breakfast there. It was a popular gathering spot for attorneys because it was a short walk from the courthouses, said former Riverside County District Attorney Rod Pacheco.

Pacheco, who now is a practicing attorney, described the fire as “sad news.”

“It was close, a good, solid breakfast, and the price was always right,” Pacheco said. “There were other places to eat and for some reason, we gravitated toward it.”

It was at Mr. T’s — over breakfast with a Press-Enterprise reporter in 1995 —  Pacheco said he kicked off his successful campaign for state assembly. Pacheco learned that a candidate had dropped out, and Pacheco decided to run. He won, serving three two-year terms representing the 64th District that encompassed Riverside, Jurupa Valley, Norco and downtown Corona.

Staff Writer Fielding Buck contributed to this story.

For more information about CalFire map updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Keeping Warm with a Space Heater | Corona, CA

Now that we are in the colder winter months, many of us use space heaters in order to stay warm. It is very commonplace, especially in smaller homes that don’t have chimneys and fireplaces. Unfortunately, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) estimates that more than 20,000 residential fires every year are associated with the use of room (space) heaters. This is why it is important the practice some space heater safety during this chilly time of year. However, electric space heaters are typically safer than portable fuel-burning models (e.g. natural gas, propane, kerosene.)

When purchasing a space heater, make sure to purchase one labeled by a nationally recognized testing laboratory such as UL (Underwriters Laboratories), CSA (Canadian Standards Association) or ETL (Intertek) to ensure that the heater’s construction and performance meet voluntary safety standards. Also, look for specific safety features that will shut the unit off under certain conditions. These can include:

  • Overheating
  • Low oxygen levels (aka oxygen depletion sensor)
  • Tip-over switch
  • Touch sensor (if the grill is touched)

When setting up a space heater, remember to keep it at least 36 inches from any flammable or combustible materials and place it on the floor, unless it is designed otherwise.

When using a fuel-fired space heater in an enclosed area, it is a good idea to leave a window or door partially open to allow for fresh air to enter, to prevent carbon monoxide (CO) buildup or a depletion of oxygen. Electric heaters should be kept out of wet or moist places like bathrooms and plugged into an outlet, not an extension cord, which could result in overheating and fire. Stay warm!

For more information about CalFire map updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

After years of delays, CalFire says updated and expanded wildfire hazard maps are on their way | Corona, CA

Chris Nichols | Monday, December 20, 2021 | Sacramento, CA

For years, state officials have promised and failed to update maps that show the parts of California most at risk for wildfire. In the more than a dozen years since current maps were released, climate change and climate science have dramatically adjusted our understanding of what might burn.

Now, state officials say the long-awaited updates will land in the next few months.

The stakes for the new fire risk maps are high. Local governments use CalFire’s hazard zones as a guidepost in deciding where new homes and businesses should be approved — or rejected.

Homeowners who live inside high risk zones have to disclose that risk when they decide to sell. They also are required by a new state law to keep their homes fire-proofed — by building out defensible space. The number of homes in those high-risk areas has grown in the last decade. The state’s wildfires now regularly set records in size and destruction. “Fires are burning in ways that nobody has seen before,” said CalFire Chief Thom Porter at an August news conference. “Yes, I keep saying that. You keep hearing that. But it is absolutely true.”

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection last updated its fire hazard severity zone maps in 2007, well before recent record-breaking megafires swept across California. Past mapping focused on geographic hazards such as forests and canyons where fire spreads, according to Daniel Berlant, CalFire’s assistant deputy director. This time, climate hazards are front and center.

“What has changed,” Berlant added, “is these extreme wind events, which carry embers now well past that outer edge [where development intersects with wildlands] into areas that historically were not even designated with a fire hazard level.”

On the maps, which cover all 58 counties, are three color-coded designations: yellow for moderate fire hazard, orange for high hazard and red for very high. This time, CalFire says those zones are likely to be bigger, taking in more Californians and more areas where homes and wildlands meet.

In Santa Rosa, where the Tubbs Fire caused widespread urban damage, homeowner Brian Fies is waiting anxiously for CalFire’s new maps. Fies’ home burned to the ground in 2017, and he wrote a memoir about his loss called A Fire Story. Eventually, he rebuilt on the same land.

“Climate change is making risk a moving target,” Fies said. “Places that used to be safe aren’t safe anymore, and firefighters need to understand and reflect that change.”

New maps will have big impact

Local governments use CalFire’s hazard zones to help decide where new homes and businesses should be approved. Inside these zones, developers must follow the state’s strict and more costly fire safety rules, known as the 7A codes.

Those codes require:

  • Wider roads, more access to water supplies, and more road and directional signs.
  • More costly materials for new home construction, including walls, roofs and eaves that can resist flying embers and heat from fire.
  • Clearing 100 feet of defensible space around buildings; and 
  • Disclosure that a piece of property is within a fire zone when it’s sold.

Local governments have argued that expanding the hazard zones will make it harder to meet state targets for new affordable housing, said Staci Heaton, a regulatory affairs advocate with the Rural County Representatives of California. “The state’s telling [counties] they have to build so many housing units per year,” she said. “Even in the high fire hazard severity zones, they have to strike that balance between fire mitigation and also building these low-income housing units.”

For homeowners within hazard zones, Heaton argued life is likely to be more difficult. Homes in risky areas are more likely to lose their electricity when the wind picks up, she says, because utility companies may target their neighborhoods for planned power shut offs.

And Heaton expects some property owners could find their homes uninsurable. “Once those fire maps get finalized, I think we’re going to be seeing a lot more non-renewals,” she said. “We’re already seeing a lot of homeowner insurance non-renewals in our communities.”

‘We want to get the science right’

CalFire officials maintain that they’re focused on precision, not politics, in drawing the new hazard zones, which were anticipated in 2020. “We want to get the science right,” Berlant said. “Unfortunately, building that science into a model has taken us a lot longer than we had originally projected.”

The update will incorporate extreme weather models that didn’t exist when the current maps were developed nearly two decades ago. But critics like Rick Halsey, director of the California Chaparral Institute, a nonprofit environmental group, say CalFire has long had the capacity to make the maps more accurate and relevant. “To have [the old maps] still hanging around is pretty inexcusable,” he said. Halsey added that the existing maps are both outdated and flawed.

In Santa Rosa, the Tubbs Fire burned the Fountaingrove neighborhood, just as the Hanly Fire had in 1964, and a blaze before that in 1908. “This is what’s so tragic: That area burned twice before, virtually in the same footprint in the previous 100 years,” Halsey said. “And so why that history wasn’t incorporated into the fire severity maps is a mystery to me.”

Approximately 95% of structures seriously damaged in California wildfires from 2013 through 2020 took place inside either federal, state or local fire hazard zones, according to data provided by CalFire. Dave Sapsis, CalFire’s wildland fire scientist in charge of the maps, points out that the state’s hazard maps proved highly accurate in predicting where structures would burn during California’s recent wildfires.

But he also acknowledged that the map for Santa Rosa should have incorporated historical burn risk better. “Our existing model right now works almost all the time except when it doesn’t,” Sapsis said. “And that was a fairly sizable miss.”

Complicating things for the public, CalFire’s maps only show state fire hazard zones and some local hazard zones, but not those designated by the federal government.

Because of climate change, CalFire’s Sapsis expects to update hazard maps more often in the future.  “That hazard is increasing with time,” Sapsis explained. “The fire environment is getting worse. It’s getting drier, it’s getting windier.”

Berlant, CalFire’s assistant deputy director, said the agency would unveil the new maps to county governments “as early as the beginning of next year.”

In Santa Rosa, homeowner Brian Fies says state and local governments should put the map in every mailbox. “In my opinion they should push it,” Fies said. “Not just passively provided, not just it’s available on, you know, Page 312 of the county’s website, but they should push it.”

Fies’ neighborhood wasn’t in a high-risk zone on the CalFire map when he rebuilt. But he’s worried about what the updated maps may reveal. “It seems like nowhere in the western half of North America is there a safe place anymore,” Fies added. “It’s difficult, even in the suburbs.”

For more information about CalFire map updates, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Keeping Your Pets Safe in a Fire | Corona, CA

Every member of the family should know your home’s escape plan, pets included. You’ve likely talked to your spouse and other family members about what to do in the event of an emergency, but have you also factored your pets into the equation as well? The United States Fire Administration estimates that 500,000 pets are affected annually by fires. Before your smoke detector system alerts you of a fire, here’s what you should know about including your pet into your fire safety plan:

Fire escape plans. Every home needs to have a fire escape plan. If you have pets, especially mobile ones, it is important that you include them in your plans. Assign an adult to be on pet patrol – ensuring that leashes are easily-accessible so attaching to collars and escaping safely is a breeze. It’s important that you know returning into a burning building or house to rescue your pet is not safe.

In fact, the more you and your family practice a fire-escape plan, the smoother things will go in the event of a fire. To practice, sound your smoke alarm and try to have the entire family meet outside at your designated meeting spot in as little time as possible.

Pet-Alert window cling. Did you know that there is a way to alert firefighters about any pets in your home? If you have pets, buy a pet-alert window cling and write down the number of pets inside your house.

Fire prevention. Believe it or not, pets are capable of accidentally starting house fires. Pets have a general curiosity, causing them to explore candles, appliances and even fireplaces. Don’t leave your pet unattended around fire hazards and try to keep them away from these fire hazards at all times.

For more information about keeping your pets safe in a fire, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.