Tag Archives: residential evacuations

Cooking Safety Tips for Older Adults | Corona, CA

Accidental fires

We all want to feel safe in our own homes. It’s a sanctuary away from all of the outside world’s madness. We kick off our shoes, fix ourselves a nice hot meal and curl up on the couch with our favorite relaxing pastime. We keep a first aid kit handy, lock our doors, we keep our phone charged and close by – all of these little habits keep us prepared for anything.

One of the leading causes of home injuries and deaths in the home is related to cooking. And those of us that are 65+ are at an even higher risk. Unfortunately, we all need to eat. And while all these tips work for everyone, let’s also protect those of us on the latter side of life with these simple cooking tips for fire safety:

Don’t forget. There are times when we get sidetracked – it’s natural. So, if you need to step away from the kitchen for even a small amount of time, turn off the oven/stove.

Keep it clean. Grease fires can start unexpectedly. To lessen the chance of these happening, keep the range clean from grease or other debris that can accidentally catch from a stray flame.

Tighten things up. The last thing we think about when we are in the kitchen is what we are wearing. When cooking, keep your sleeves rolled up to prevent accidentally catching on an open flame.

Test the alarms. It’s important to test smoke detectors on a monthly basis and change out batteries once a year. Keeping these alarms in abundance throughout the house will give ample time to get to safety.

For more information about cooking fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

California’s Oak Fire destroys at least 42 structures as it burns more than 18,000 acres near Yosemite National Park | Corona, CA

By Elizabeth Wolfe and Steve Almasy, CNN | Updated 8:29 PM ET, Wed July 27, 2022

(CNN)California’s Oak Fire has burned through more than 18,000 acres and destroyed more than 40 structures since it ignited near Yosemite National Park Friday, as fire crews in the air battle visibility issues and personnel on the groundwork steep terrain.

The fire grew only slightly Tuesday — to 18,532 acres and containment remained at 26%, according to an update from state fire management agency Cal Fire.

“Although good progress continues on the fire, there is much work to be done,” the update said. Officials said several evacuation orders had been changed to fire advisements.

Some areas are not accessible to bulldozers so crews on foot cut in a fire line, and smoke from the fire hampered the response from the 24 helicopter units involved.

One firefighter stood Wednesday morning by a spot where they had been able to stop the flames from advancing.

“For the past two days what we’ve been doing is coming back with hoes and … hand tools. We dig out all the smokes and hot spots to make sure that nothing ends up on … the green side (where vegetation wasn’t burned),” firefighter Travis Gooch told CNN’s Adrienne Broaddus. “It’s kind of a relief that everything is kind of looking like it’s holding up the way it’s supposed to.”

Gooch, who is from Manteca, said he and his team work overnight and slept for about an hour on their firetrucks.

“The first night we were here, no one slept,” he said. “So, last night to get to sleep for an hour. It was nice. Everyone is looking forward to going back to camp and getting to sleep for today.”

There have been no firefighter injuries reported since the blaze began, the cause of which is under investigation.

A total of 42 single residence structures and 19 outbuildings have been destroyed in the fire, the update said. More than 1,100 structures remain threatened.

On Tuesday morning, Cal Fire officials said in the overnight incident report: “Fire crews continue providing structure defense, extinguishing hot spots, and building and improving direct lines. Persistent drought, critically dry fuels, and tree mortality continue to contribute to the fire’s spread.”

More than 3,000 personnel are tackling the fire, deploying air and land efforts including two dozen helicopters, 286 fire engines, 68 water tenders and 94 bulldozers, according to Cal Fire.

The challenging terrain and abundant dry vegetation fueling the fire has complicated efforts to tamp down its growth, Cal Fire spokesperson Cpt. Keith Wade told CNN Monday.

“The footprint out here, the acreage of available fuels to burn when the fire gets going, along with the available topography — the canyons, the drainages — the wind that flows through these areas, can make the fire behavior erratic and it can explode … the ferociousness of that fire at times can be intense,” Wade said.

The Oak Fire is the largest of California’s fire season so far, Cal Fire data shows. But it remains relatively small compared to other California wildfires in recent years: It’s dwarfed, for example, by blazes like last year’s Dixie Fire, which consumed more than 960,000 acres, or the August Complex Fire the year prior that scorched more than a million acres — the state’s largest ever.

There have been 23 wildfires in California so far this month, according to Cal Fire, but only three have exceeded 500 acres. None have come close to the mass destruction of the Oak Fire, due in part to the exceedingly dry conditions in the area, Wade said.

“I think the real difference that firefighters are experiencing on this one is how dry everything is, it’s definitely been (drier) as the years have been going on,” he said. “We’ve noticed that there seems to be less precipitation, less moisture and the available fuel load is definitely out there.”

The fire’s rapid growth has also made evacuation efforts more difficult, Cal Fire Battalion Chief Jon Heggie told CNN on Monday, noting officials and law enforcement are doing their best to notify residents when they need to leave.

“The reality is, it’s moving so quickly, it’s not giving people a lot of time and they are sometimes just going to have to evacuate with the shirts on their back,” Heggie said.

The incremental progress made by fire crews has allowed officials to reduce evacuation orders in some areas to fire advisements, Cal Fire said.

An evacuation shelter has been set up at Mariposa Elementary School for displaced residents.

Mariposa County has been under a state of emergency since Saturday, when Gov. Gavin Newsom announced the proclamation.

Southern California fire officials have been expecting this summer to bring an especially challenging fire season due to the increased frequency of wildfires and the dry, hot conditions in much of the state.

Heggie attributed the Oak Fire’s “velocity and intensity” to the state’s prolonged drought and human-caused climate change.

“What I can tell you is this is a direct result of what is climate change,” he said. “You can’t have a 10-year drought in California and expect things to be the same. And we are now paying the price for that 10-year drought and that climate change.”

California is among the western states that have been suffering under a prolonged megadrought that has been heavily exacerbated by the climate crisis.

“That dead fuel that’s a result from that climate change and that drought is what’s driving these, what we are now calling, ‘mega fires,'” Heggie said.

It’s not just the Western US dealing with extreme fire conditions. Wildfires around the globe have intensified and become more commonplace, according to a report from the UN Environment Programme. The report’s analysis found the number of extreme wildfire events will increase by 30% by 2050.

The report suggested it’s time we “learn to live with fire,” urging authorities and policymakers to cooperate with local communities to use Indigenous knowledge and invest in planning and prevention efforts.

CNN’s Poppy Harlow, Taylor Romine, Stella Chan, Sara Smart and Rachel Ramirez contributed to this report.

For more information about the Oak fire, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Spring Has Sprung! Make Your Home Fire Safe | Corona, CA

Springtime is a renewing time of year. We shed all the winter off and begin to prepare for sunnier days and warmer nights. One way we celebrate this refreshing time of year is by spring cleaning. Tossing out the old and welcoming in a new, cleaner time of year. So, while you are reorganizing your closets and preparing for a lighter, brighter season, keep in mind some of these fire safety tips:

Smoke and Carbon Monoxide alarms. These are our first line of defense against house fires, so it is important that you test alarms monthly and replace batteries as needed.

Kitchen. Keep countertops and stovetops free of grease and clutter that can easily catch fire, like oven mitts, towels, or wooden utensils.

Electrical cords. Take the time to check all electrical cords in your home for wear and tear.

Clothes dryers. Excess lint in the dryer is the number one cause of clothes dryer fires, so make sure to use a lint filter and clean it regularly.

Grilling. Keeping a grill clean from grease and fat not only prevents fires, but helps food cook better. Check the propane tank, hose, and all connection points for leaks. If you have a charcoal grill, use only charcoal starter fluid.

Fire escape plan. No one wants to be involved in a house fire, but accidents happen all the time. Being prepared is the number one way to not only look after you and your loved ones but keeping calm whilst doing so. Create a fire escape plan, including a map of each home level with two escape routes in each room. Discuss and practice the plan with everyone in the household. The more you’re prepared, the safer your will be.

For more information about fire safety, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.

Evacuation Orders Lifted for Arlanza Fire on Thanksgiving Morning | Corona, CA

By CAITLIN ANTONIOS | cantonios@scng.com |

PUBLISHED: November 24, 2021 at 8:43 p.m. | UPDATED: November 25, 2021 at 7:17 p.m.

Evacuation orders were lifted Thursday morning after the Arlanza Fire in Riverside jumped containment lines Wednesday night amidst strong Santa Ana wind gusts. Officials began the evacuations after the vegetation fire, which began burning Sunday Nov. 21, grew by about seven acres and began to threaten homes. Road closures on Mitchell Avenue and Valley Drive as well as evacuations on Valley between Misty Ridge Drive and Mitchell began just before 8 p.m.

“The concern is embers are blowing towards homes due to the high winds,” said Officer Ryan Railsback, a spokesperson for the Riverside Police Department.

A least a dozen homes were evacuated Wednesday night, Railsback said.

Riverside Police and Fire Departments announced Thursday morning that while all evacuation orders were lifted, streets would still be closed at Chadbourne Avenue and Valley Drive, Mitchell Avenue and Valley Drive and Misty Ridge Drive and Valley Drive as crews continue to work in the area.

The fire, pushed by Santa Ana winds, was stopped at 17 acres on Sunday and was 90% contained as of Thursday. As of Thursday evening, the fire was holding at 23 acres.

No residents were injured; one firefighter was transported to a local hospital with minor injuries.

The fire department noted that the smoke will continue to drift well into Saturday, and residents should close windows and doors if they are impacted by it.

The blaze was caused by a vehicle that tried to turn around in mulch.

For more information about current fire statuses, call CJ Suppression at 888-821-2334 or visit the website at www.cjsuppression.com.

CJ Suppression proudly serves Corona, CA and all surrounding areas.